CURRENT PUPAE - Chrysalides and cocoons

If you are a beginner and need information on rearing from small caterpillars, or hatching out pupae, please order the All Colour Paperback BUTTERFLIES. INSTRUCTIONS ARE NOT SENT WITH EACH SPECIES, you need to acquire basic skills and this book is a simple way of doing so.

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Marsh Fritillary aurinia 10 pupae
Availability: May 2020



Marsh Fritillary Eurydryas aurinia

The butterflies fly from May into June. Eggs are laid in large clusters on the underside of Devil’s Bit Scabious.The larvae Feed on Honeysuckle (wild is best), Snowberry or the natural foodplant Devil’s Bit Scabious.  The larvae live in a tightly formed web, growing only a little before they hibernate in autumn.

£38.00 £23.50
New Clouded Yellow Colias australis 5 pupae
Availability: June/July 2020


New Clouded Yellow Colias australis 

 Almost indistinguishable from the Pale Clouded Yellow hyale. This species was not recognised until 1947 when a Belgian entomologist, M. Berger, found that the larvae not only fed on Horseshoe Vetch Hippocrepis, but are totally different in appearance, having a brilliantly coloured pattern in black, yellow and green. Larvae will produce butterflies again this season. They will also feed on Crown Vetch Coronilla.
 

 

£14.50
Green-veined White napi 10 Pupae
Availability: Autumn


Green-veined White  Pieris napi

 A delicate member of the White family, with variable markings and prominent underside veining.  The larvae feed on many Cruficerae with a particular liking for Jack by the Hedge Alliaria, Horseradish Armoracia rusticana, Cresses and Mustards.

 Very easy to breed. Several generations are possible in a season. The pupa hibernates. Keep the pupae cool or in the fridge until April. Lay them out to emerge in May and provide the adults with nectar flowers and stems of the foodplant on which to lay.

 Harmless to garden plants (they prefer wild plants), this is a species you can breed to enhance the local countryside.

£12.95
Clouded Yellow Crocea 5 pupae
Availability: Summer 2020


Clouded Yellow Butterfly Colias crocea Larvae

 A great favourite with entomologists and extremely easy to rear on potted Clover. The larvae grow fast and will produce butterflies very quickly, particularly in warm conditions. These pupae produce butterflies in a week or two.

£14.50
Orange Tip Anthocharis cardamines pupae
Availability: NOW


Orange Tip Anthocharis cardamines Europe

It's difficult to get pupae of this species, but we have a stock at the moment.

Store the pupae in a cool place, for the winter, even a refrigerator, loose in a plastic box. An early spring butterfly. Depending on locality and season, the butterflies usually begin to fly in May. The male has the orange tips. Both sexes have mottled undersides in green which is actually made of microscopic scales of black and yellow, giving the illusion of green. The curious pupae look like thorns.

Eggs are laid on Garlic Mustard, Sweet Rocket and Cuckoo Flower or Lady’s Smock. The larvae live singly and are canabalistic. Not difficult to breed, particularly on potted foodplant. Camouflage in all stages is remarkable.

 

Graphium agamemnon Asia 8 pupae
Availability: March


Graphium agamemnon Asia 

Very distinctive lime-green patterning on dark background. The butterflies "dance" on the flowers whilst feeding. At rest the wings are usually open wide.

The larvae feed on Custart Apple and other Annonaceae.

 

£16.95
Long-tailed Blue Lampides boeticus 5 pupae
Availability: September


Long-tailed Blue Lampides boeticus Europe

 Livestock is seldom available. This is a scarce migrant to Britain. The larvae live inside the flowers and seed pods of Broom, Pea, and almost any Leguminosae (Papilionaceae)

 

£25.00
Brown Hairstreak betulae TEN pupae
Availability: July/August


Brown Hairstreak Thecla betulae

Pupae of this species hardly ever become available. A curious pupa, superbly camouflaged. Pair the butterflies in captivity and get the females to lay on Blackthorn twigs. Store for the winter in a cool place that is not totally lacking in moisture. The eggs are used to a cold, wet winter! The larvae hatch when the Blackthorn (Sloe) buds open.  Supplies are limited - first come first served.

 

 

 

 

£45.00 £39.95
Deathshead Hawk atropos pupae
Availability: NOW


Deathshead Hawkmoth Acherontia atropos Pupae

These pupae can be incubated now or kept dormant until the spring. The larvae feed on many plants in the potato family, Solanaceae, but you don’t have to have these to keep the larvae, they do well on Privet. They have also been found feeding on Buddleia, resulting in a pale coloured larva that matches the leaves. The duration of the egg stage is just a few days, and the larvae grow probably twice as fast as our native hawkmoth larvae, completing their life cycle in as little as 4-6 weeks in summer temperatures.

The moth is just amazing to have alive on your hand! It is furry, and squeaks – almost like handling a little mammal. It also humps its back and displays the blue markings on the body, as well as the famous skull and crossbones on the thorax. The moth needs to feed, not from flowers but from a pad soaked in weak honey or sugar solution. They will seldom feed themselves: it is necessary to hold each moth firmly and, with a strong setting needle, guide the short mouth tube into the sweet feeding pads. They will resist the handling, but once the proboscis samples the sweet solution, they usually coninue feeding of their own accord for some time. The moths may need this assistance repeatedly every few days. Moths have been found inside beehives, attracted by the sweet smell of honey. 

In winter moths may be produced before spring if the pupae are kept warm.  To overwinter, bury the pupae in light compost that is not too damp but not allowed to dry out. The top of each pupa should be just showing. Store in a cool place (10-12 degrees C) away from predadors. Bring into the warm in April ready for May emergence. When the pupae are to be incubated, keep them warm (20-30 degrees C) and moist, and well drained. The ideal conditions are as described for the Pupae Nest on the WWB website.

Eyed Hawk Smerinthus ocellata pupae
Availability: NOW


Eyed Hawk Smerinthus ocellata

These pupae will produce moths this year. Pairings extremely easy. Larvae feed on Apple, Willows and Sallows. The larvae do best on living foodplant because these plants do not last well in water. Very attractive larvae, highly camouflaged with silvery markings on green, and very streamlined. Single brooded. The moth has beautiful hindwings which it flashes if disturbed. Huge eyespots brightly coloured with magenta and blue. Highly recommended. 

Additional reported foodplants: Poplars, Blackthorn, Lime, Privet, Alder, Birch, Plum, Blackthorn, some Viburnums, Various Prunus, Laurel.


 

 

Lime Hawk tiliae pupae
Availability: NOW


Lime Hawkmoth Mimas tiliae

Some excellent forms of pattern and colour are appearing from these pupae, including one-spot, banded and brick red forms, as well as a wide colour range of normal pattern. There is no way of detecting these in the early stages, but we are illustrating some of these extreme forms that have been emerging.

Store pupae refrigerated for the winter. The moths normally emerge in May/June.

Extremely easy to rear on Lime or Elm. Other reported foodplants include Cherry, Alder, Birch, Oak, Hazel, Acer including Sycamore, Sorbus, Apple, Pear and Ash! In autumn the larvae will grow faster if kept warm. 

The larvae do particularly well sleeved on growing foodplant but can be kept in plastic boxes or cages. Beautiful streamlined larvae. Larger larvae are often heavily marked with flame and scarlet spots and blotches. Very variable. They pupate underground. In captivity they will pupate amongst folds of cloth or absorbent tissue.

Privet Hawk S ligustri Pupae
Availability: NOW


Privet Hawk Sphinx ligustri

One of the largest Hawkmoths. These will produce adults this year, or you can keep them cool for breeding next year.

The caterpillar becomes enormous and is characteristic of the name Sphinx moths, by its sphinx-like resting position. Adults emerge in June and July.  They need nectar from the flowers of Privet, Valerian, Buddleia. 

Larval foodplants: Privet, Lilac, Ash, also reportedly Spiraea, Viburnum opulus, and other Viburnums,  Holly, Dogwood, Snowberry, Apple, Pear, Oleander, Leycesteria, Currant.

One generation in the year. Privet Hawks breed readily in a large cage with nectar and foodplant.