CURRENT PUPAE - Chrysalides and cocoons

If you are a beginner and need information on rearing from small caterpillars, or hatching out pupae, please order the All Colour Paperback BUTTERFLIES. INSTRUCTIONS ARE NOT SENT WITH EACH SPECIES, you need to acquire basic skills and this book is a simple way of doing so.

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Emperor Moth pavonia  cocoons
Availability: NOW


Emperor Moth Saturnia pavonia

There is a shortage of Emperor cocoons this season.

Britain’s only Silkmoth. The male and female have similar markings, but the female is larger, and the male is more brightly coloured.

Emergence is in March/April.  Pairing is easy – if you have a female, she may attract males from miles away. The Emperor Moth occurs in many rural areas but is particularly found on heaths, where they breed on Heathers. The larvae feed on a variety of plants, including Bramble, Raspberry, Hawthorn, Blackthorn, Apple, Plum, Blackthorn, Oak, Hornbeam, Birch, Heathers and Heaths, Blueberry, Meadowsweet, Wild Rose, Sea Buckthorn, Purple Loosestrife, Willows especially Osier Salix viminalis, Pussy Willow (Sallow).

The caterpillars cluster in the early instars, eventually spreading out and becoming brightly coloured, as beautiful as such exotics as the Moon Moths. The cocoon is spun in the foodplant. An interesting construction with a neck and open end, through which the adult emerges. 

Store cocoons in a cool place and in November put them into an unheated outhouse, or in a fridge until March. The moths normally emerge in April.

This is one of the fun species to rear.  Demand for this species is high. Please order early.

Giant Atlas Moth Attacus atlas cocoons
Availability: Late summer


Giant Atlas Moth Attacus atlas

Atlas cocoons have become very difficult to obtain, particularly the dormant Thailand race, but we have good stocks immediately available, for breeding soon or they can be held cool until you wish to breed from them

The largest moth in the world.  Winter cocoons are dormant. You can choose whether to incubate them or keep them cold until the spring. To get them to emerge, raise the temperature to 15 degrees C, and gradually up to 30 degrees C or more, and very humid. They need very warm and humid tropical conditions. When hot, soak the cocoons at least once or twice daily. 

It is probably better to keep them cool (8 -12 degrees C) and dormant until mid-April, or even May, then raise the temperature and humidity as described above.  They will respond better to summer conditions.

Pairing is achieved in a cage that is ample for the size of the moths but not so large that they can become too separated.

Larvae feed on Privet Ligustrum and are easily reared in warm and moist conditions.  Atlas larvae will also feed on Tree of Heaven Ailanthus, Osier Willow Salix viminalis, Citrus and undoubtedly a number of other substitute plants outside their normal habitat.

Attacus lorquinii  cocoons
Availability: NOW


Attacus lorquinii - Philippines 

This species, endemic to the Philippines, is characterised by the prominent red lines and markings across the wings. 

You can choose whether to incubate them or keep them cold until the spring. To get them to emerge, raise the temperature to 15 degrees C, and gradually up to 30 degrees C or more, and very humid. They need very warm and humid tropical conditions. When hot, soak the cocoons at least once or twice daily. 

It is probably better to keep them cool (8 -12 degrees C) and dormant until mid-April, or even May, then raise the temperature and humidity as described above.  They will respond better to summer conditions.

Pairing is achieved in a cage that is ample for the size of the moths but not so large that they can become too separated.The larvae feed on Privet. They appreciate humidity and a temperature of at least 25 degrees C.

 

Epiphora mythimnia TWO pupae
Availability: NOW


Epiphora mythimnia from Africa

A few cocoons are immediately available.

A fine African species, seldom obtained. The moth has deeply hooked wings and markings not unlike those of Atlas, but the colouring is a unique combination of burgundy, white and yellow, with clear triangular and circular eye-spots. mythimnia is one of the smaller species, and very beautiful.

The moths breed relatively easily. Ceanothus is an excellent foodplant and is evergreen. The larvae are extremely beautiful and have a lot in common with the white fleshy tubercled larvae of Atlas moths.

Reported larval foodplants are Ceanothus and Buckthorn Rhamnus.


 

 

£15.95
Gynandsia maia Africa TWO pupae
Availability: NOW


Gynandsia maia Africa

A very spectacular Giant Silkmoth that we have only once offered before. These are subterranean pupae are available at just the right season for breeding. The larvae are most spectacular.

See http://www.silkmoths.bizland.com/sample6.htm

Foodplants include Oak, Peach, Wattle (Acacia) and Legume trees such as Laburnum, False Acacia and Cassia.

 We have no experience of this species but we recommend it to Saturniid specialists. It will be very rewarding.

 

 



£15.95
Automeris belti Mexico and Central America TWO Pupae
Availability: NOW


Automeris belti Mexico and Central America Pupae

The first time offered by WWB. Seldom reared in captivity.

The moth is extremely beautiful. Larvae are gregarious until quite large. They are reported to feed on False Acacia Robinia, Oak Quercus, and Prunus particularly Cherry. Fig Ficus is also suggested, but Ficus is a widely differing Genus and they may not take to some. As Automeris are very polyphagous, we expect the larvae to accept a wide variety of foodplants and suggest trying Salix Willows and Sallows for a start.

£14.95
Oak Silkmoth polyphemus  cocoons SPECIAL PRICE
Availability: NOW


American Oak Silkmoth Antheraea polyphemus

5 for £34.95 NOW £29.95

The hindwings of both sexes have huge target eyespots. Pairing sometimes easy, other times changes of setup are needed.  The female lays a large number of eggs.

The larvae are easy to rear on Oak or Osier Willow. Along the sides of larger larvae there are silver spangles, like drops of mercury. Lovely larvae to rear.

They are also reported to feed on Hawthorn,Oak, Birch, Willow, Sallow, Maple, Apple, Cherry, Alder, Elm. Also try Walnut, Pseudacacia, Sumac Rhus typhina.

Oak Silkmoth polyphemus  5 cocoons at GIVE-AWAY PRICE!
Availability: NOW


American Oak Silkmoth Antheraea polyphemus

Normally £34.95 We have a few we are offering at only £15.95 for 5 cocoons!!

The hindwings of both sexes have huge target eyespots. Pairing sometimes easy, other times changes of setup are needed.  The female lays a large number of eggs.

The larvae are easy to rear on Oak or Osier Willow. Along the sides of larger larvae there are silver spangles, like drops of mercury. Lovely larvae to rear.

They are also reported to feed on Hawthorn,Oak, Birch, Willow, Sallow, Maple, Apple, Cherry, Alder, Elm. Also try Walnut, Pseudacacia, Sumac Rhus typhina.

£15.95
Cherry Moth promethea cocoons
Availability: Autumn 2019


Cherry Moth Callosamia promethea North America 

This unusual species is greatly under-rated. Have YOU ever bred it, or do you know of anyone who has? Give it a try, it is very rewarding, and there are no other species with such unusual caterpillars, except rarer ones in the same genus. You will be glad you tried!

The male and female moths are so different that they might be taken for two different species. The male is mainly black, with very shapely wings. The ground colour of the female is wine red.  Promethea flies and breeds by day: the males like sunshine but must not be left out to bake. Pairing is often most successful on sunny evenings.

The larvae are gregarious until quite large, when they take on a very unusual appearance, being white, with knobbles like sealing wax in bright reds, yellows and oranges. The caterpillar illustrated is immature and does not yet fully show these features.

Reported foodplants include Lilac and Cherry, Lime, Pine, Pear, Peach, Poplar, Apple, Tulip Tree Liriodendron, Ash, Maple, Apple, Oak and Rhododendron.

Madagascan Emperor Antherina suraka Madagascar  cocoons
Availability: Late spring


Madagascan Emperor  Antherina suraka cocoons

Not only is the moth highly colourful and attractive, but the larvae are also most interesting, having an almost infinite number of different colour forms.

The moths pair as easily as pernyi (!) and lay lots of eggs.

The larvae are easy to keep indoor or sleeved out in summer weather,  and will take a variety of foodplants. Those reported include Oleander, Privet, Willows, Beech, Liquidambar, Hawthorn, Grapevine, Lilac, Cherry, Laurel, Forcythia, Rhus, Pistachia, Apple, Pear, Plum, Peach and Cabbage.

We highly recommend this species.

 

African Moon Moth Argema mimosae Cocoons
Availability: NOW


African Moon Moth Argema mimosae 

The moth is a miniature of the Giant Madagascan Moon Moth as a whole lot easier to breed!  Spray the cocoons daily, keep at about 25 degrees C, or a little more, and they start to emerge as they do in the rainy season.

Pairings are not automatic but not difficult. The larvae are most spectacular and they thrive on Eucalyptus, which is evergreen and therefore suitable for rearing in summer or winter. Other foodplants recorded: Liquidambar, Walnut, Sumac Rhus sp.
  
 

 

Pseudobunaea irius TWO pupae
Availability: NOW


Pseudobunaea irius Kenya

We have a few pupae of this handsome Saturniid. 

This is an underground pupa, waiting just for some African warmth and the rains to produce most beautiful moths.

Larvae may take Poplars, Privet, Oak or Pine. Try on a variety of plants and let them choose.

£15.95