Current EGGS and LARVAE

If you are a beginner and need information on rearing from small caterpillars, or hatching out pupae, please order the All Colour Paperback BUTTERFLIES. INSTRUCTIONS ARE NOT SENT WITH EACH SPECIES, you need to acquire basic skills and this book is a simple way of doing so.

Display: List / Grid
Show:
Sort By:
Dark Green Fritillary aglaia 20 larvae
Availability: NOW


Dark Green Fritillary Mesoacidalia aglaia 20 larvae

 

Best reared on potted Violet. These larvae are in hibernation. Keep the larvae in winter out of doors, in all weathers, protected amongst dead bramble and other leaves, amongst growing Violet. Cover with netting sleeve to exclude predators and to prevent escape.

 

SPECIAL PRICE for 20 larvae - half the normal!

 

 

£12.95
Black Hairstreak S. pruni 50 eggs SPECIAL OFFER
Availability: NOW


Black Hairstreak Strymonidia pruni 50 eggs

 

The Black Hairstreak is one of Britain’s greatest rarities, occuring in very few localities, but doing well in them. Foodplant Blackthorn. We are pleased to be able to offer this very special species now as eggs which are stored cool until the buds open in spring.

 

A great rarity, an ideal and easy species to introduce and establish in Blackthorn stands.

 

 

On hatching, the young larvae need bursting buds to crawl into : not opened leaf like most other species.

 

 


 


 

£150.00 £75.00
Black Hairstreak S. pruni TEN eggs
Availability: NOW


Black Hairstreak Strymonidia pruni

 

The Black Hairstreak is one of Britain’s greatest rarities, occuring in very few localities, but doing well in them. Foodplant Blackthorn. We are pleased to be able to offer this very special species now as eggs which are stored cool until the buds open in spring. 

 

 


 


 

£30.00 £20.00
Marbled White galathea 50 larvae
Availability: NOW


Marbled White Butterfly Melanargia galathea

 

A favourite from the chalk downlands of southern Britain. Pre-hibernation larvae which live on potted coarse grasses and produce butterflies next year. To hibernate these larvae you need potted grass, securely contained in a netting sleeve.  Make sure you evict any spiders or other predatory creatures! Keep the pot outside in natural weather conditions.

In spring the larvae will stray, and again in summer when they are ready to find a secluded place in which to hang and change to pupae, so make sure they are in a secure cage.

 

 

£25.00
Marbled White galathea 10 larvae
Availability: NOW


Marbled White Butterfly Melanargia galathea

 

 

A favourite from the chalk downlands of southern Britain. Pre-hibernation larvae which live on potted coarse grasses and produce butterflies next year. To hibernate these larvae you need potted grass, securely contained in a netting sleeve.  Make sure you evict any spiders or other predatory creatures! Keep the pot outside in natural weather conditions.

In spring the larvae will stray and again in summer when they are ready to find a secluded place in which to hang and change to pupae, so make sure they are in a secure cage.

 

£12.95
Brown Hairstreak T. betulae 20 eggs
Availability: NOW


Brown Hairstreak Thecla betulae

 

Eggs of the Brown Hairstreak are available through autumn and winter. They are laid on Blackthorn twigs. Keep the eggs in a very cool place until the Blackthorn buds open in spring.The larvae hatch and quickly burrow into the opening buds to feed until they are much larger. It is best to keep them on growing foodplant.

£12.95
Brown Hairstreak betulae 3 mated females
Availability: July/August 2018


Brown Hairstreak Thecla betulae

 

 

You receive three live mated female Brown Hairstreaks. Set them up in a laying cage, with a potted Blackthorn bush, or cut twigs in water. Some breeders sleeve the females on a Blackthorn branch. Provide nectar or sugar pads to feed the butterflies. Store eggs for the winter in a cool place that is not totally lacking in moisture. The eggs are used to a cold, wet winter! The larvae hatch when the Blackthorn (Sloe) buds open.  Supplies are limited - first come first served.

 

 

 

 

 

 

£16.00
White-letter Hairstreak Strymonidia w-album 10 eggs
Availability: Autumn/Winter 2018


White-letter Hairstreak Strymonidia w-album

 

Some eggs available immediately, for a short period. Very difficult to obtain.

Very seldom available. Winter is passed in the eggs stage.  Feed spring larvae on Elm and Wych Elm. Ideally sleeve outside, or pot foodplant to feed sleeved larvae indoors or outside. 

Wych Elm flower buds are breaking in early February, even in the north. These are sometimes on branches higher off the ground. Some even start as early as November in milder winters. Flowering trees need very little patience to search out.  

The larvae only require the buds to be “cracking open” for them to find a crevice to sit in and start burrowing further into the bud.


 

 

 

£29.95
Privet Hawk Sphinx ligustri 15 eggs
Availability: June/July 2018


Privet Hawkmoth Sphinx ligustri 

 

 

One of the largest Hawkmoths. The caterpillar becomes enormous and is characteristic of the name Sphinx moths, by its sphinx-like resting position. Adults emerge in June and July.  They need nectar from the flowers of Privet, Valerian, Buddleia.  

Larval foodplants: Privet, Lilac, Ash, also reportedly Spiraea, Viburnum opulus, and other Viburnums,  Holly, Dogwood, Snowberry, Apple, Pear, Oleander, Leycesteria, Currant.

One generation in the year. Privet Hawks breed readily in a large cage with nectar and foodplant. 

The large pupae are formed underground. Store the pupae for emergence next summer. 

 


 

£12.95
Kentish Glory, Versicolora eggs
Availability: March


Kentish Glory  Endromis versicolora

 

Kentish Glory are breeding and laying extremely well, so there are special offers for quantities, while stocks last.

 

The Eggs are the first of the season to be laid and are sent from February.  They are yellow when laid, later turning maroon in colour, matching the twigs they are laid on.
 

This species is now found only in Scotland, and parts of Central Europe.  Our stock is European.

 

Keep the eggs cool until you have the first leaves of foodplant. Birch is the normal foodplant, but the larvae can also be reared on Hazel, Alder, Hornbeam, and Lime. Rearing of Kentish Glory larvae is very easy, indoors or outside, and they do particularly well sleeved on their foodplant.

 

The larvae, black at first,  cluster on the twigs. Later they are green and spread out a little, clinging on to the twigs, they look just like Birch catkins. Absolute masters of camouflage.

 

In May the larvae pupate in leaf litter and soil and settle down until the new season starts again in February. This is a very easy species. The male and female moths share the same patterning, but the female is much larger and the male has particularly rich chestnut markings. Pairing is easy. Provide twigs of foodplant, on which to lay. At this time there are no leaves. Just leave the moths together pairing and egg-laying take place naturally.

 

Our thanks to Jens Stolt who has kindly allowed us to use his beautiful illustration of the life history of this rare species.

 




 

Hog sphinx Darapsa myron North America 15 eggs
Availability: May/June 2018


Hog sphinx Darapsa myron North America

 

A very attractive little North American Hawkmoth. The moth is beautifully patterned in greens and greys, with orange hindwings and a very streamlined shape.

 

The caterpillar feeds on Vine and Virginia Creeper. Large larvae have a curious shape and markings, with swollen segments behind the head, suggesting the head of a snake. There are green and brown forms, with intermediate colours.

 

Absent from our lists for more than 10 years, we now have a breeding stock to supply eggs and larvae in 2018. 

 

 

£14.95
Clifden Nonpareil (Blue Underwing) Catocala fraxini 15 Eggs
Availability:   


Clifden Nonpareil (Blue Underwing) Catocala fraxini

 

 

The largest underwing, spectacular blue. Store eggs refrigerated until May.

 

This species is now almost extinct in Britain. We are offering European stock of this fine moth, the largest of all Underwings and remarkable for its BLUE hindwings. The young larvae are immensely active and care must be taken when transferring them to fooplant on hatching, because they can tangle themselves up if you try to move more than one at a time! Feed on Aspen and other Poplars. The larvae are the largest of this genus and very satisfying to rear. Moths emerge in late summer, laying eggs that overwinter.

£12.95