Current EGGS and LARVAE

If you are a beginner and need information on rearing from small caterpillars, or hatching out pupae, please order the All Colour Paperback BUTTERFLIES. INSTRUCTIONS ARE NOT SENT WITH EACH SPECIES, you need to acquire basic skills and this book is a simple way of doing so.

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Marbled White galathea 10 larvae
Availability: NOW


Marbled White Butterfly Melanargia galathea

 

 

A favourite from the chalk downlands of southern Britain. Pre-hibernation larvae which live on potted coarse grasses and produce butterflies next year. To hibernate these larvae you need potted grass, securely contained in a netting sleeve.  Make sure you evict any spiders or other predatory creatures! Keep the pot outside in natural weather conditions.

In spring the larvae will stray and again in summer when they are ready to find a secluded place in which to hang and change to pupae, so make sure they are in a secure cage.

 

£12.95
Marbled White galathea 50 larvae
Availability: NOW


Marbled White Butterfly Melanargia galathea

 

A favourite from the chalk downlands of southern Britain. Pre-hibernation larvae which live on potted coarse grasses and produce butterflies next year. To hibernate these larvae you need potted grass, securely contained in a netting sleeve.  Make sure you evict any spiders or other predatory creatures! Keep the pot outside in natural weather conditions.

In spring the larvae will stray, and again in summer when they are ready to find a secluded place in which to hang and change to pupae, so make sure they are in a secure cage.

 

 

£25.00
Brown Hairstreak T. betulae 20 eggs
Availability: NOW


Brown Hairstreak Thecla betulae

 

Eggs of the Brown Hairstreak are available through autumn and winter. They are laid on Blackthorn twigs. Keep the eggs in a very cool place until the Blackthorn buds open in spring.The larvae hatch and quickly burrow into the opening buds to feed until they are much larger. It is best to keep them on growing foodplant.

£12.95
Brown Hairstreak betulae 3 mated females
Availability: July/August 2018


Brown Hairstreak Thecla betulae

 

 

You receive three live mated female Brown Hairstreaks. Set them up in a laying cage, with a potted Blackthorn bush, or cut twigs in water. Some breeders sleeve the females on a Blackthorn branch. Provide nectar or sugar pads to feed the butterflies. Store eggs for the winter in a cool place that is not totally lacking in moisture. The eggs are used to a cold, wet winter! The larvae hatch when the Blackthorn (Sloe) buds open.  Supplies are limited - first come first served.

 

 

 

 

 

 

£16.00
Privet Hawk Sphinx ligustri 15 eggs
Availability: June/July 2018


Privet Hawkmoth Sphinx ligustri 

 

 

One of the largest Hawkmoths. The caterpillar becomes enormous and is characteristic of the name Sphinx moths, by its sphinx-like resting position. Adults emerge in June and July.  They need nectar from the flowers of Privet, Valerian, Buddleia.  

Larval foodplants: Privet, Lilac, Ash, also reportedly Spiraea, Viburnum opulus, and other Viburnums,  Holly, Dogwood, Snowberry, Apple, Pear, Oleander, Leycesteria, Currant.

One generation in the year. Privet Hawks breed readily in a large cage with nectar and foodplant. 

The large pupae are formed underground. Store the pupae for emergence next summer. 

 


 

£12.95
Convolvulous Hawk convolvuli 15 eggs
Availability: NOW


Convolvulous Hawkmoth Herse convolvuli 

 

 

Huge caterpillars: fascinating to rear.  The pupa has a curious proboscis, like a jug handle. Feeds at dusk, tobacco plants, petunia, lillies and phlox.

 

Larval Foodplants: Convolvulus, Field Bindweed, Hedge Bindweed, some Morning Glories.

 

 

 

 


 

£12.95
Oak Eggar Moth Lasiocampa quercus 15 eggs
Availability: June/July


Oak Eggar Lasiocampa quercus

 

The largest of the Eggars. Larvae grow before hibernation. Very easily kept sleeved out, both before, during and after hibernation. Foodplants Birch, Hazel, Alder, Lilac, Willow, Sallow, Aspen Poplar, Bramble, Blackcurrant, Heather, Blackthorn, Plum, Blueberry, Sea Buckthorn and Apple.

 

£10.95
Garden Tiger caja Woolly Bears 50 larvae
Availability: NOW


Garden Tiger Moth Arctia caja 50 larvae

 

The price for 50 Woolly Bears has been substantially reduced to encourage releasing in the wild.

 

 

 

In earlier days one can remember finding the furry caterpillars amongst the fresh spring nettles and docks on roadsides, almost everywhere. Sadly those days have gone, but it may be possible to encourage them back in little corners that you select. Garden Tigers are prolific breeders.  Release 50 larvae on a patch and, who knows, you might bring them back to your area.

 

 

Garden Tiger larvae Woolly Bears  grow fast on Dock, Dandelion, Dead Nettle, Nettle and many other hedgerow plants, also Pussy Willow Salix caprea and Osier Willow Salix viminalis.  You can also feed them conveniently on Cabbage. Now a most difficult species to obtain.

 

These are summer larvae which, in the wild, would hibernate, but if you keep them warm and light, many will produce another generation this year.

 

Children love them!

 

£62.50 £42.95
Alder Kitten Harpayia bicuspis 15 eggs
Availability: Spring 2018


Alder Kitten Harpayia bicuspis 

All the Kittens are now very scarce, and bicuspis is quite the rarest of all. Never listed before by WWB.

Eggs are available in May, and again in July.

The larvae are miniatures of the Puss Moth vinula. The more intense charcoal black banding on the wings of the moth, distinguishes the Alder Kitten from the Sallow and Poplar Kittens.

The larvae feed on Alder, Poplars and Birches. Cocoons are formed on the bark of branches and twigs.  Just like the Puss Moth, the cocoon is made of chewed bark, mixed with very strong silk, with such camouflage that the cocoon just looks like a little swelling on the bark.

A truly fascinating species that moth connoisseurs should not miss. 

£18.50
Buff Tip Moth bucephala 10 larvae
Availability:   


Buff Tip Moth Phalera bucephala 

 

The Buff Tip, once very common, is remarkable and a must for the enthusiast. You could help re-establish Buff Tips in your area. The eggs are laid in a tight cluster on a leaf of the foodplant. A hatched group of eggs is illustrated and you can see the skeletonised leaf left by the tiny larvae as they progress feeding across the leaf. The larvae are gregarious and quite conspicuous by the trail of eaten leaves, and the fact that they form quite a lumpy cluster! 

 

They are coloured with a netted pattern of yellow and black, warning colours that ward off predators, and larger larvae have a covering of long, fine white silky hairs. The group does not disperse until pupation when they descend to burrow quite deep into the soil.

 

The moth is a master of deception, rolling its wings to form a silvery tube with extraordinary likeness at either end to a broken branch. If it flies up on being disturbed, it is hard to spot on landing, unless you know what you are looking for, because it so closely resembles a piece of branch.  The larvae feed Maple, Birch, Hazel, Laburnham, Poplar, Prunus (Plums and Blackthorn), Oak, False Acacia Robinia, Hazel, Rose, Willows, Sallows, Lime, Elm, Viburnums.

 

We recommend Buff Tips as a great experience of nature.

£11.95
Vapourer Moth antiqua egg batch
Availability: NOW


Vapourer Moth Orgyia antiqua

 

 

Very interesting both for its moth and its very attractive and colourful caterpillar. Winter eggs are supplied for storage in the cool until spring. The larvae normally hatch in May/June or later, and feed on a wide variety of trees, which include Hawthorn, Willows and Sallows, most fruit trees, Hazel, Rose, Lime and Oak. The larvae are beautifully patterned and coloured, and decorated by prominent shaving brush-like tufts. The cocoon is spun amongst the foodplant.

 

The male moth is delicate, chestnut brown, with prominent feathered antennae, which are used to detect the wingless female, who emerges from the cocoon and rests on it, calling for a male. She lays her egg batch all over the cocoon where the eggs remain through the winter ready to start off the next generation.

£12.95
White Satin Moth salicis 10 larvae
Availability: NOW


White Satin Moth Leucoma salicis 

Never before listed by WWB. This moth, with soft white wings, is not frequently encountered. The larvae are beautifully patterned with tufts of colourful hairs. Best not to handle them, as some people find the hairs are a skin irritant.  

The foodplants are Willows, Sallows and Poplars.

Established larvae, going into hiberbatioin, are available immediately for a short time.

 

 

£11.95