Current EGGS and LARVAE

If you are a beginner and need information on rearing from small caterpillars, or hatching out pupae, please order the All Colour Paperback BUTTERFLIES. INSTRUCTIONS ARE NOT SENT WITH EACH SPECIES, you need to acquire basic skills and this book is a simple way of doing so.

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Eyed Hawk ocellata eggs
Availability: NOW


Eyed Hawk Smerinthus ocellata  

Fascinatingly camouflaged larvae which exactly match their leafy background. Easy to breed.

The larvae feed on Apple, Willows, Poplars. Other reported foodplants are Lime, Privet, Alder, Birch, Plum, Blackthorn, some Viburnums, Various Prunus, Laurel.

At pupation time, provide a container of compost to a depth of about 10cm, with a lid. The larvae burrow to pupate.  The moths, with vivid eye-spots, emerge the following spring.

 

 

Eyed Hawk ocellata FIFTY eggs LOWEST PRICE EVER!
Availability: NOW


Eyed Hawk Smerinthus ocellata  

Fascinatingly camouflaged larvae which exactly match their leafy background. Easy to breed.

The larvae feed on Apple, Willows, Poplars. Other reported foodplants are Lime, Privet, Alder, Birch, Plum, Blackthorn, some Viburnums, Various Prunus, Laurel.

At pupation time, provide a container of compost to a depth of about 10cm, with a lid. The larvae burrow to pupate.  The moths, with vivid eye-spots, emerge the following spring.

 

 

£20.00
Heliconius species 10 larvae
Availability: July


Heliconius species Central and South America

Larvae feed on Passion Plant Passifolora caerulea. Often in clusters when young, the larvae grow fast in warm conditions. Ideally on growing foodplant.

Larvae may be of more than one species. Melpomone and erato , probably could include some cydno and hecale. 

The Heliconius butterflies are mimetic, not only of each other, but they also imitate other species that are distastful to predators. So don't be surprised if your butterflies don't have the same pattern and marking as the illustration, but they do have the same narrow wing shape in common, and their habits are wonderful to observe. Some are capapble of hovering and even flying backwards. The butterflies are able to gather not only nectar through the proboscis, but also pollen which they store in the coils of the proboscis.

Some individuals have been known to survive for months, even in captive conditions.

Eggs are laid on the growing shoots and tendrils of Passiflora, on which the larvae feed. Most lay eggs individually though some lay in groups. The butterflies are continuously brooded and can become a magnificent feature of a greenhouse or conservatory.

 

£12.95
Heliconius melpomone 10 larvae
Availability: July


Heliconius melpomone Central and South America

The Heliconius butterflies are mimetic, not only of each other, but they also imitate other species that are distastful to predators. The infinite variety of colour forms  and patterns is astonishing.

The habits of Heliconius butterflies are wonderful to observe. Some are capapble of hovering and even flying backwards. The butterflies are able to gather not only nectar through the proboscis, but also pollen which they store in the coils of the proboscis.

Some individuals have been known to survive for months, even in captive conditions.

Eggs are laid on the growing shoots and tendrils of Passiflora, on which the larvae feed. Most lay eggs individually though some lay in groups. The butterflies are continuously brooded and can become a magnificent feature of a greenhouse or conservatory.

 

£14.95
Hypolimnas bolina Tropical Asia 10 larvae
Availability: NOW


Hypolimnas bolina Tropical Asia. 

When explorers first encountered this butterfly they were hugely excited by the iridescent blue and white markings. This is indeed one of the most beautiful tropical butterflies, even though quite widespread and common. The larvae can be reared on stinging nettle! a

The female is larger than the male, with different patterning in blue, white and orange on black.

 

 

£12.95
Willowherb Hawkmoth Proserpinus proserpina Pupae SPECIAL PRICE!
Availability: NOW



Willowherb Hawkmoth Proserpinus proserpina

SCARCE! Only a few pupae available. Lower price this year!

Special promotional price normally £29.50 for FIVE pupae, now £21.50

This rather rare Hawkmoth is a gem, seldom encountered, though it lives throughout much of western and central Europe, eastwards into Russia.  

The larva is rather like a grey form of Small Elephant Hawk. The foodplant is Rosebay Willowherb Epilobium, Evening Primrose Oenothera and Purple Loosetrife Lythrum. The pretty little green moth has prominent egg-yolk coloured hindwings.  The normal flight period is June and July.

Proserpinus proserpina 15 eggs or 10 larvae according to availability
Availability: July


Proserpina Hawkmoth Proserpinus proserpina

 This rather rare Hawkmoth is a gem, seldom encountered, though it lives throughout much of western and central Europe, eastwards into Russia.  

The pretty little green moth has prominent egg-yolk coloured hindwings.  

The larva is rather like a grey form of Small Elephant Hawk. Take a close look and decide which end is which! There is a false eye-spot - at the TAIL!

The foodplant is Rosebay Willowherb Epilobium, Evening Primrose Oenothera and Purple Loosetrife Lythrum.

The normal flight period is June and July.

£12.95
Oleander Hawk nerii 15 eggs or 10 larvae, according to availability
Availability: NOW


Oleander Hawk Daphnis nerii 

One of the finest of all Hawkmoths. The larvae are very fast growing indeed and they consume a lot of food. It is often possible to have the larvae from hatching to pupation in little more than a month.

Larvae thrive on Privet and can be reared on Periwinkle Vinca. Suitable for winter or summer rearing. Oleander Nerium is a natural foodplant but it is often tough and leathery, so the alternives are usually better than Oleander.

 

£12.95
DUO Clifden Nonpareil Catocala fraxini with Red Underwing nupta 15 eggs of each SPECIAL PRICE
Availability: Autumn


DUO Clifden Nonpareil Catocala fraxini with Red Underwing nupta 15 eggs of each SPECIAL PRICE

Just a few of this special DUO available NOW!

Our two most spectacular Underwing moths. Eggs due to hatch in May.

The larvae feed on Poplars and Willows (Osier is ideal). When they hatch, use a soft artist’s brush to transfer the larvae on to fresh foodplant in a plastic box. Within a few days, we recommend that the larvae are sleeved on growing foodplant, which can be potted or growing outside. The larvae are well camouflaged on the stems. After becoming quite large, they pupate amongst leaf litter and produce moths in late summer. Eggs are laid on bark and in captivity they will usually lay on netting, preferably double, coarse mesh.

£15.95
Catocala dilecta 10 eggs
Availability: NOW


Catocala dilecta Croatia 

From southern Europe, this species is new to WWB and few breeders have experienced raising Catocala dilecta. One of the Crimson Underwings, very seldom offered. 

The larvae are gnarled to match their Oak foodplants. They are reported to take evergreen Oaks which are common in their habitats. 

 

£19.95 £12.95
Philotherma rosa natalica 15 eggs
Availability: NOW


Philotherma rosa natalica Africa

One of the Eggars Lasiocampidae. Never offered before by WWB! The larvae have a most spectacular front view! They are covered with hairs which requre some care to avoid possible skin irritation. Foodplants are widely varied and include the evergreen Laurel Prunus laurocerasus. Many deciduous trees may be accepted and they also feed on Bramble and a variety of low-growing plants such as Sow Thistle. Try them on a salad of different leaves and see which they take to. Likely to be continuously brooded.

£12.95
Red Underwing Catocala nupta 15 eggs
Availability: Autumn


Red Underwing Catocala nupta

A large and very grand species, with the most wonderful scarlet underwings which are flashed from beneath its grey exterior when disturbed.  The larvae feed on Poplars and Willows (Osier is ideal). When they hatch, use a soft artist’s brush to transfer the larvae on to fresh Poplar in a plastic box. Within a few days, we recommend that the larvae are sleeved on growing foodplant, which can be potted or growing outside. The larvae are well camouflaged on the Poplar stems. After becoming quite large, they pupate amongst leaf litter and produce moths in late summer. Eggs are laid on bark and in captivity they will usually lay on netting, preferably double, coarse mesh. The eggs overwinter, so keep them in the fridge until spring.

£12.95