Current EGGS and LARVAE

If you are a beginner and need information on rearing from small caterpillars, or hatching out pupae, please order the All Colour Paperback BUTTERFLIES. INSTRUCTIONS ARE NOT SENT WITH EACH SPECIES, you need to acquire basic skills and this book is a simple way of doing so.

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Hissing Hawkmoth Phyllosphingia dissimilis 15 eggs
Availability: June/July


Hissing Hawkmoth Phyllosphingia dissimiliis Far East

This is the first time offered by WWB. 

The larvae feed on Walnut Juglans, Alder Alnus, Birch Betula, and is reported to accept Salix Willows and Sallows. Mature larvae are extremely handsome and often varied in their colouring and pattern. The pupae, formed underground, are not only rather curious in shape and very rough texture, but they have the extraordinary habit of becoming active at night, particuarly if they are in the light. They wriggle, hiss and jump around and are able to burrow themselves into soil! By day they are totally still and very well camouflaged as ground debris.

 

£14.95
Poplar Hawk Laothoe populi 15 eggs
Availability: Imminent


Poplar Hawkmoth Laothoe populi 

 

Fast growing, the larvae feed on most Willows and Poplars. They do well in sleeves or caged.

 

This is one of the few hawkmoths that produce two broods of moths in the year.

 

The larvae become very fat and vary in both the ground colour, in shades of green or blue/green, and in their markings which often include red spots as well as the oblique stripes down the sides.

 

The larvae need to burrow into compost for pupation.

£12.50
Privet Hawk Sphinx ligustri 15 eggs
Availability: June/July 2018


Privet Hawkmoth Sphinx ligustri 

 

 

One of the largest Hawkmoths. The caterpillar becomes enormous and is characteristic of the name Sphinx moths, by its sphinx-like resting position. Adults emerge in June and July.  They need nectar from the flowers of Privet, Valerian, Buddleia.  

Larval foodplants: Privet, Lilac, Ash, also reportedly Spiraea, Viburnum opulus, and other Viburnums,  Holly, Dogwood, Snowberry, Apple, Pear, Oleander, Leycesteria, Currant.

One generation in the year. Privet Hawks breed readily in a large cage with nectar and foodplant. 

The large pupae are formed underground. Store the pupae for emergence next summer. 

 


 

£12.95
Broad-bordered Bee Hawk fuciformis larvae
Availability: Summer


Broad-bordered Bee Hawk  Hemaris  fuciformis Larvae

 

A very difficult species to obtain as eggs and larvae. Sent out in June, supplies will be limited. Larval foodplant is Honeysuckle. Not difficult to rear. Hibernation is in the pupal stage. The moth emerges with a thin layer of grey scales on the wings. Remarkably, on its first flight, the scales are shed, leaving transparent bee-like wings.

 

 

£12.95
Cephanodes hylas Eastern Green Bee Hawk 15 eggs
Availability: June


Eastern Green Bee Hawk Cephanodes hylas

A very large species from Far Eastern Russia, occurring also across S.E. Asia and Australia. Said to be easy to breed in captivity.  

One of the most preferred plants for laying and larval feeding is Gardnia. The larvae also feed well on Honeysuckle Lonicera species.

Only a few pupae available. 

Another first time for WWB!

£13.95
Kentish Glory, Versicolora eggs
Availability: From March 2019


Kentish Glory  Endromis versicolora

 

The Eggs are the first of the season to be laid and are sent from February.  They are yellow when laid, later turning maroon in colour, matching the twigs they are laid on.
 

This species is now found only in Scotland, and parts of Central Europe.  Our stock is European.

 

Keep the eggs cool until you have the first leaves of foodplant. Birch is the normal foodplant, but the larvae can also be reared on Hazel, Alder, Hornbeam, and Lime. Rearing of Kentish Glory larvae is very easy, indoors or outside, and they do particularly well sleeved on their foodplant.

 

The larvae, black at first,  cluster on the twigs. Later they are green and spread out a little, clinging on to the twigs, they look just like Birch catkins. Absolute masters of camouflage.

 

In May the larvae pupate in leaf litter and soil and settle down until the new season starts again in February. This is a very easy species. The male and female moths share the same patterning, but the female is much larger and the male has particularly rich chestnut markings. Pairing is easy. Provide twigs of foodplant, on which to lay. At this time there are no leaves. Just leave the moths together pairing and egg-laying take place naturally.

 

Our thanks to Jens Stolt who has kindly allowed us to use his beautiful illustration of the life history of this rare species.

 




 

Hog sphinx Darapsa myron North America 15 eggs
Availability: June/July


Hog sphinx Darapsa myron North America

 

A very attractive little North American Hawkmoth. The moth is beautifully patterned in greens and greys, with orange hindwings and a very streamlined shape.

 

The caterpillar feeds on Vine and Virginia Creeper. Large larvae have a curious shape and markings, with swollen segments behind the head, suggesting the head of a snake. There are green and brown forms, with intermediate colours.

 

Absent from our lists for more than 10 years, we now have a breeding stock to supply eggs and larvae in 2018. 

 

 

£14.95
Red Underwing Catocala nupta 15 eggs
Availability: NOW


Red Underwing Catocala nupta

A large and very grand species, with the most wonderful scarlet underwings which are flashed from beneath its grey exterior when disturbed.  The larvae feed on Poplars and Willows (Osier is ideal). When they hatch, use a soft artist’s brush to transfer the larvae on to fresh Poplar in a plastic box. Within a few days, we recommend that the larvae are sleeved on growing foodplant, which can be potted or growing outside. The larvae are well camouflaged on the Poplar stems. After becoming quite large, they pupate amongst leaf litter and produce moths in late summer. Eggs are laid on bark and in captivity they will usually lay on netting, preferably double, coarse mesh. The eggs overwinter, so keep them in the fridge until spring.

£12.95
Oak Eggar Moth Lasiocampa quercus 15 eggs
Availability: June/July


Oak Eggar Lasiocampa quercus

 

The largest of the Eggars. Larvae grow before hibernation. Very easily kept sleeved out, both before, during and after hibernation. Foodplants Birch, Hazel, Alder, Lilac, Willow, Sallow, Aspen Poplar, Bramble, Blackcurrant, Heather, Blackthorn, Plum, Blueberry, Sea Buckthorn and Apple.

 

£10.95
Garden Tiger caja Woolly Bears 10 larvae
Availability: NOW


Garden Tiger Moth Arctia caja  10 Larvae

 

Children love them!

 

Garden Tiger larvae Woolly Bears  grow fast on Dock, Dandelion, Dead Nettle, Nettle and many other hedgerow plants, also Pussy Willow Salix caprea and Osier Willow Salix viminalis.  You can also feed them conveniently on Cabbage.

 

Now a most difficult species to obtain.

 

These are spring and summer larvae.  In the wild, late summer larvae would hibernate, but if you keep them warm and light, many will produce another generation this year.

 

If you wish to hibernate Wooly Bears, sleeve them in autumn on Willow or Sallow (Pussy Willow). The falling leaves curl to form a ventilated ball in which the larvae hibernate. If all goes well in winter the larvae emerge in spring and feed from the new spring leaves.

 

From October to spring the larvae are in hibernation. Orders are booked for dispatch when the larvae awake and feed.

 
£12.95
Garden Tiger caja Woolly Bears 50 larvae
Availability: August to October


Garden Tiger Moth Arctia caja 50 larvae

 

The price for 50 Woolly Bears has been substantially reduced to encourage releasing in the wild.

Children love them!

 

Garden Tiger larvae Woolly Bears  grow fast on Dock, Dandelion, Dead Nettle, Nettle and many other hedgerow plants, also Pussy Willow Salix caprea and Osier Willow Salix viminalis.  You can also feed them conveniently on Cabbage. 

Now a most difficult species to obtain.

These are spring and summer larvae.  In the wild, late summer larvae would hibernate, but if you keep them warm and light, many will produce another generation this year.

If you wish to hibernate Wooly Bears, sleeve them in autumn on Willow or Sallow (Pussy Willow). The falling leaves curl to form a ventilated ball in which the larvae hibernate. If all goes well in winter the larvae emerge in spring and feed from the new spring leaves.

From October to spring the larvae are in hibernation. Orders are booked for dispatch when the larvae awake and feed.

 
£62.50 £42.95
Cinnabar Moth Hipocrita jacobaeae 25 larvae
Availability: NOW


Cinnabar Moth Hipocrita jacobaeae 

Plentiful supplies of larvae available from late May. Very easy to rear.

Once an extremely common British Moth, less common over most of Europe, but over the last 10 years there has been a marked decline in numbers. The summer of 2016 brought a reversal of this decline and we can help this species back from danger of disappearing.

The larvae feed on Groundsel and Ragwort Senecio. The larvae are ringed in bright orange and black, nature's warning colours, and they absorb chemicals from the foodplant that adversely affect predators who ignore the warning. Ragwort is a mis-understood plant that provides an abundance of nectar to bees, butterflies and other insects. There is evidence that Ragwort plants that are pulled up and left to dry, can be detrimental to cattle and horses if they eat the dried plants. Animals can be seen grazing safely in fields containing growing green plants. There is nothing to be gained from pulling up Ragwort plants, because they are biennials that flower and die in the same year. So a patch of Ragwort can provide valuable nectar to thousands of wild insects, and be host to Cinnabar larvae and, job completed, it dies at the end of summer. 

The Cinnabar moth flies by day, more than by night, and is protected from predators, by the very striking colours of charcoal and scarlet, and bitter-tasting chemicals derived from the larval foodplant, enabling the moth to display its bright colours, yet not be attacked by predators. 

Cinnabar larvae can be raised in sleeves on growing Ragwort. We find the sleeves fitted with a zip are particularly successful. When the larvae are large, if you put in the sleeve several handfuls of springy wood shavings or dried leaf litter, they will form thin silken cocoons in which to pupate.

Could you help to spread this colourful day-flying moth again in your area?

Store pupae cool for the winter, even in a fridge, loose in a plastic box, without any padding.  In May lay them out in an emerging cage and wait for the moths to emerge.

 

£8.50