Current EGGS and LARVAE

If you are a beginner and need information on rearing from small caterpillars, or hatching out pupae, please order the All Colour Paperback BUTTERFLIES. INSTRUCTIONS ARE NOT SENT WITH EACH SPECIES, you need to acquire basic skills and this book is a simple way of doing so.

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Madagascan Moon Moth mittrei 10 eggs
Availability: Winter


Madagascan Moon Moth Argema mittrei

Eggs of this huge Moon Moth are the largest we have ever seen. See the photo of one compared to other Giant Silkmoth eggs!

The larvae like warmth but not excessive temperature: likewise humidity but not too much. They feed well on Liquidambar, Eucalyptus gunii, Rhus typhina and Rhus glabra.

Huge netted cocoons of silvery silk – probably the biggest cocoon in the world! Both male and female moths are tailed but those of the male are very extreme.

This is a species that the connoisseur should not miss!

£25.95
Actias artemis Asia 15 eggs or 10 larvae according to availability
Availability: Summer 2020


Actias artemis Asia  

This species occurs in Japan and much of the Far East, including Far Eastern Russia which is the home of this unusual stock.

Reported larval foodplants include Willows, Birch, Walnut, Oak, Hawthorn and Alder. Very likely other trees as well. This is a medium sized Moon Moth with very differently shaped male and female. Seldom available. This is a chance to find out more about the species.

 

£12.95
Giant Atlas Moth Attacus atlas 15 eggs
Availability: NOW


Giant Atlas Moth Attacus atlas 

One of the largest of all moth species in the world!  The larvae feed well on Privet, at any time of the year, and might accept Portuguese Laurel.  They require very clean conditions, always with fresh food. Alternative recorded foodplants include Willows, Lilac, Apple, Plum, Ash, Cherry and Tree of Heaven Ailanthus.  Atlas larvae like to browse on several foodplants and settle for the one or more that they like.

The larvae like warmth 25 -30 degrees C and humid jungle conditions, which are best achieved in a tank or plastic container, rather than a netting cage. Given these conditions the larvae are not difficult to rear, and spin cocoons in about 8 weeks from hatching.

 

£15.95
Bullseye Moth Automeris io 15 eggs
Availability: Summer 2020


Bullseye Moth Automeris io North America 

Eggs and Larvae of the Bullseye Moth are not available every year. This small silkmoth has a number of interesting characteristics.

The male and female are distinctly different colours – both have the enormous eye markings on the hindwings which are exposed when the moth is disturbed.

The larvae are covered by branched spines – don’t touch them – they sting like a nettle! They are gregarious until the larvae are quite large, changing colour at each skin change.

For pairing, keep the moths in a cage the size of the Pyjama Mini Cage. Fertile eggs develop a black dot which is the micropyle, through which the embryo breathes. A useful indicator of fertility, not present in most other species.

The larvae are polyphagous, ie they will accept a wide variety of foodplants, which include such trees as Oak, Lime, Willow, Hazel, Bramble, Apple, Hawthorn and more.

£12.95
European Cynthia Moth Philosamia cynthia eggs
Availability: Summer 2020


European Cynthia Moth Philosamia cynthia  

This species has now become scarce in Europe and we may not get regular supplies in future. 

Very easy to rear on Privet, Willows, Ailanthus, Llilac and other shrubs, including evergreens, such as Portugal Laurel, Viburnum tinus and Acuba.

The moths pair easily. The young larvae are yellow, decorated with black spots, and live gregariously. As they grow they become pure white, with prominent black spots. In the final instar they have a white waxy bloom.

Highly recommended.
 

Eri Silkmoth Philosamia cynthia ricini 10 larvae
Availability: NOW


Eri Silkmoth Philosamia cynthia ricini  

A very attractive form with dark banded moths. Very easy indeed to breed in captivity.

The larvae feed on Privet, and are very easy to rear in all seasons. Other evergreen foodplants accepted include Portuguese Laurel Prunus lusitanica, which they relish, Rhododendron, Laurel, and Golden-spotted Laurel Acuba. 

Deciduous foodplants: Tree of Heaven Ailanthus is quite their favourite food. They also thrive on Willows, especially Osier Salix viminalis, Cherry, Laburnham, Lilac, Rose, Plum, Apple, Ash, Birch, Elder and doubtless many more.

The larvae are gregarious when young, yellow and black. Larger larvae are covered with white waxy powder. This subspecies is continuously brooded and can be kept going in all seasons. The cocoon is white and can be used to produce spun silk.

 

£12.95
Eri Silkmoth Philosamia cynthia ricini 15 eggs
Availability: December/January


Eri Silkmoth Philosamia cynthia ricini  

A very attractive form with dark banded moths. Very easy indeed to breed in captivity.

The larvae feed on Privet, and are very easy to rear in all seasons. Other evergreen foodplants accepted include Portuguese Laurel Prunus lusitanica, which they relish, Rhododendron, Laurel, and Golden-spotted Laurel Acuba. 

Deciduous foodplants: Tree of Heaven Ailanthus is quite their favourite food. They also thrive on Willows, especially Osier Salix viminalis, Cherry, Laburnham, Lilac, Rose, Plum, Apple, Ash, Birch, Elder and doubtless many more.

The larvae are gregarious when young, yellow and black. Larger larvae are covered with white waxy powder. This subspecies is continuously brooded and can be kept going in all seasons. The cocoon is white and can be used to produce spun silk.

 

£12.95
Rothschildia triloba 10 larvae
Availability: Spring 2020


Rothschildia triloba Central America

This species has similarities with Rothschildia orizaba. It was considered as a sub-species but now has species status. Rothschildia is considered as the new world equivalent of the Atlas Moths of Asia. The larvae can be reared very successfully on Privet. Other reported plants and families include Ash Fraxinus, Roseaceae, Rubiaceae, Willows and Sallows Salicaceae, Ailanthus, and Portuguese Laurel Prunus serotina.

Young larvae and black with yellow warts and other markings. Larger larvae are bright green, with a lateral line demarking a camouflaging change of colour, like the change in colour from the upperside of a leaf to underside. 

Cocoons will diapause, producing adults in the following summer.

 

£16.95
Madagascan Emperor Antherina suraka 15 eggs
Availability: NOW


Madagascan Emperor Antherina suraka 

Not only is the moth highly colourful and attractive, but the larvae are also fascinating, with more different forms of colour and pattern than we have seen in any other species! 

The black stage, marked with orange tubercles, changes to green with a variety of other colours and patterns. They are easy to keep and will take a variety of foodplants. Those reported include Oleander, Privet, Willows, Beech, Liquidambar, Hawthorn, Grapevine, Lilac, Cherry, Laurel, Forcythia, Rhus, Pistachia, Apple, Pear, Plum, Peach and Cabbage. In winter Privet is the ideal foodplant.

Keep the larvae and cocoons warm and moths will emerge from cocoons without a dormant period. The moths are the easiest of all species to breed.

We highly recommend this species.

£12.95
Actias isis from Sulawesi 10 eggs
Availability: Date uncertain


Actias isis from Sulawesi, Indonesia.  

Our specialist breeder will have eggs very shortly in August. Demand will be high, so please order early.

The male has some of the richest colouring of all the world's Moon Moths. Both sexes are giant. The female is even larger and is bright yellow, with large moon-like markings. Her tails are stockier and shorter.

The larvae can be reared out of season on evergreen Portuguese Laurel Prunus lusitanica, or Eucalyptus gunii. They have also been known to accept Strawberry Tree Arbutus unedo.

In summer probably the best foodplant is Sweet Gum Liquidambar styraciflua. Other reported foodplants include Rose, Oak, Strawberry and Hawthorn. 

Actias isis  is very seldom available. 

 

£25.00
Actias dubernardi China 15 eggs
Availability: Summer 2020


Actias dubernardi China

This is a species that is very difficult to obtain.

 The moths have exceptionally long tails for their size. Male and female are differently coloured (the male is the pink and yellow one).

 The larvae feed exclusively on Pine, amongst which they are remarkably well camouflaged. Young larvae mimic the Pine male catkins. Larger larvae are easily lost among the Pine needles, yet they are contrastingly marked and patterned with bright spangles, and startling colours between the segments.

 This is a must for the serious breeder! 

£19.50
Chinese Moon Moth Actias sinensis 15 eggs
Availability: NOW


Chinese Moon Moth Actias sinensis China 

This is a rare opportunity to rear a species that hardly anybody has reared.

Eggs are being laid now. Rather seldom offered.

The male is a rich yellow colour, and prettily marked. The female is a delicate shade of eau de nil. 

Liquidambar is the main foodplant.  This is deciduous, but they can also be kept on Eucalyptus gunii, which is available throughout the winter.

The cocoon is an amazing shining lime green, with circular perforations. The moths emerge after a few weeks, depending on temperature.

 

 

 

£12.95