Current EGGS and LARVAE

If you are a beginner and need information on rearing from small caterpillars, or hatching out pupae, please order the All Colour Paperback BUTTERFLIES. INSTRUCTIONS ARE NOT SENT WITH EACH SPECIES, you need to acquire basic skills and this book is a simple way of doing so.

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White-letter Hairstreak Strymonidia w-album 10 eggs
Availability: August into September


White-letter Hairstreak Strymonidia w-album

 

Some eggs available immediately, for a short period. Very difficult to obtain.

Very seldom available. Winter is passed in the eggs stage.  Feed spring larvae on Elm and Wych Elm. Ideally sleeve outside, or pot foodplant to feed sleeved larvae indoors or outside. 

Wych Elm flower buds are breaking in early February, even in the north. These are sometimes on branches higher off the ground. Some even start as early as November in milder winters. Flowering trees need very little patience to search out.  

The larvae only require the buds to be “cracking open” for them to find a crevice to sit in and start burrowing further into the bud.


 

 

 

£29.95
Deathshead Hawk Atropos 15 Eggs,
Availability: NOW


Deathshead Hawkmoth Acheronia atropos  

Everyone’s favourite. An extreme rarity, migrating to Britain from Africa. Occasionally the larvae are found in potato fields but that’s if you are lucky and these days with modern machinery the chances of larvae being found are even more remote.

The larvae feed on many plants in the potato family, Solanaceae, but you don’t have to have these to keep the larvae: they do well on Privet. They have also been found feeding on Buddleia, resulting in a pale coloured larva that matches the leaves, but this is not a recommended foodplant.

The duration of the egg stage is just a few days, and the larvae grow probably twice as fast as our native hawkmoth larvae, completing their life cycle in as little as 4-6 weeks in summer temperatures. These larvae will produce another generation of moths within weeks of pupation, but you can keep them cool in the winter months, and have them emerge in spring. 

The moth is just amazing to have alive on your hand! It is furry, and squeaks – almost like handling a little mammal. It also humps its back and displays the blue markings on the body, as well as the famous skull and crossbones on the thorax. The moth needs to feed, not from flowers but from a pad soaked in weak honey or sugar solution. Moths have been found inside beehives, attracted by the sweet smell of honey. 

In summer, the pupae will emerge within about 4 weeks.  In autumn, to overwinter, bury the pupae in light compost that is not too damp but not allowed to dry out. The top of each pupa should be just showing. Store in a cool place (10-15 degrees C) away from predadors. Bring into the warm in April ready for May emergence. 
 

£13.95
Poplar Hawk Laothoe populi 15 eggs or 10 larvae according to availability.
Availability: July


Poplar Hawkmoth Laothoe populi 

Fast growing, the larvae feed on most Willows and Poplars. They do well in sleeves or caged.

This is one of the few hawkmoths that produce two broods of moths in the year.

The larvae become very fat and vary in both the ground colour, in shades of green or blue/green, and in their markings which often include red spots as well as the oblique stripes down the sides.

The larvae need to burrow into compost for pupation.

 

£12.50
Lime Hawk tiliae 15 eggs
Availability: August


Lime Hawkmoth Mimas tiliae 

Extremely easy to rear on Lime or Elm. Other reported foodplants include Cherry, Alder, Birch, Oak, Hazel, Acer including Sycamore, Sorbus, Apple, Pear and Ash! In autumn the larvae will grow faster if kept warm.

The larvae do particularly well sleeved on growing foodplant but can be kept in plastic boxes or cages. Beautiful streamlined larvae. Larger larvae are often heavily marked with flame and scarlet spots and blotches. Very variable. They pupate underground. In captivity they will pupate amongst folds of cloth or absorbent tissue. Store pupae refrigerated for the winter. The moths normally emerge in May/June.


 

£11.50
Eyed Hawk ocellata eggs SPECIAL PRICES
Availability: NOW


Eyed Hawk Smerinthus ocellata  

Fascinatingly camouflaged larvae which exactly match their leafy background. Easy to breed.

The larvae feed on Apple, Willows, Poplars. Other reported foodplants are Lime, Privet, Alder, Birch, Plum, Blackthorn, some Viburnums, Various Prunus, Laurel.

At pupation time, provide a container of compost to a depth of about 10cm, with a lid. The larvae burrow to pupate.  The moths, with vivid eye-spots, emerge the following spring.

 

 

Pine Hawk Pinastri 15 eggs or 10 larvae according to availability
Availability: August 2018


Pine Hawk Hyloicus pinastri 

 

 

Extremely easy to rear on Pine. The larvae change colour and pattern as they shed their skins and grow, each new attire demonstrating remarkable camouflage. They do best sleeved on growing pine but can also be reared on cut food as long as well cared for and hygienic conditions maintained. The larvae pupate in the soil.  Store pupae refrigerated until next summer.


 

£12.95
Willowherb Hawkmoth Proserpinus proserpina Pupae
Availability: NOW



Willowherb Hawkmoth Proserpinus proserpina

 

SCARCE! Only a few pupae available.

 

This rather rare Hawkmoth is a gem, seldom encountered, though it lives throughout much of western and central Europe, eastwards into Russia.  

 

The larva is rather like a grey form of Small Elephant Hawk. The foodplant is Rosebay Willowherb Epilobium, Evening Primrose Oenothera and Purple Loosetrife Lythrum. The pretty little green moth has prominent egg-yolk coloured hindwings.  The normal flight period is June and July.

 

 



 

Proserpinus proserpina 15 eggs or 10 larvae according to availability
Availability: August



Proserpina Hawkmoth Proserpinus proserpina

 This rather rare Hawkmoth is a gem, seldom encountered, though it lives throughout much of western and central Europe, eastwards into Russia.  

The pretty little green moth has prominent egg-yolk coloured hindwings.  

The larva is rather like a grey form of Small Elephant Hawk. Take a close look and decide which end is which! There is a false eye-spot - at the TAIL!

The foodplant is Rosebay Willowherb Epilobium, Evening Primrose Oenothera and Purple Loosetrife Lythrum.

The normal flight period is June and July.

£12.95
Elephant Hawk elpenor 15 eggs or 10 larvae according to availability
Availability: NOW


Elephant Hawk Dielephila elpenor  

A most attractive and easy species to rear. The larvae Willowherbs, Fuschia, Virginia Creeper, Vine and Bedstraw. Fast-growing, the larvae have two colour forms, starting green they change to black, or a lovely green form, the green being the rarest.

The larvae pupate amongst leaf litter on the ground, and emerge next spring as one of the most beautiful of all hawkmoths.

£14.95
Oleander Hawk nerii 15 eggs
Availability: September/October


Oleander Hawk Daphnis nerii 

One of the finest of all Hawkmoths. The larvae are very fast growing indeed and they consume a lot of food. It is often possible to have the larvae from hatching to pupation in little more than a month.

Larvae thrive on Privet and can be reared on Periwinkle Vinca. Suitable for winter or summer rearing. Oleander Nerium is a natural foodplant but it is often tough and leathery, so the alternives are usually better than Oleander.

 

£12.95
Convolvulous Hawk convolvuli 15 eggs or 10 larvae according to availability.
Availability: NOW


Convolvulous Hawkmoth Herse convolvuli 

The moths have started breeding. Eggs will follow this month, despite the error stating October!   Not available every year: these are very special! 

Huge caterpillars: fascinating to rear.  The pupa has a curious proboscis, like a jug handle. Feeds at dusk, Tobacco plants, Petunia, Lillies and Phlox.

Larval Foodplants: Convolvulus, Field Bindweed, Hedge Bindweed, some Morning Glories.

£12.95
Garden Tiger caja Woolly Bears 10 larvae
Availability: NOW


Garden Tiger Moth Arctia caja  10 Larvae

Garden Tiger larvae Woolly Bears  grow fast on Dock, Dandelion, Dead Nettle, Nettle and many other hedgerow plants, also Pussy Willow Salix caprea and Osier Willow Salix viminalis.  You can also feed them conveniently on Cabbage.

Now a most difficult species to obtain.

These are spring and summer larvae.  In the wild, late summer larvae would hibernate, but if you keep them warm and light, many will produce another generation this year.

If you wish to hibernate Wooly Bears, sleeve them in autumn on Willow or Sallow (Pussy Willow). The falling leaves curl to form a ventilated ball in which the larvae hibernate. If all goes well in winter the larvae emerge in spring and feed from the new spring leaves.

From October to spring the larvae are in hibernation. Orders are booked for dispatch when the larvae awake and feed.

 

£12.95