Kentish Glory versicolora 15 eggs

Kentish Glory versicolora 15 eggs
Kentish Glory versicolora 15 eggs Kentish Glory versicolora 15 eggs Kentish Glory versicolora 15 eggs Kentish Glory versicolora 15 eggs Kentish Glory versicolora 15 eggs Kentish Glory versicolora 15 eggs Kentish Glory versicolora 15 eggs Kentish Glory versicolora 15 eggs Kentish Glory versicolora 15 eggs
Availability: Spring 2018
Price: £12.95
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Description

Kentish Glory  Endromis versicolora

 

 

This species is now found only in Scotland, and parts of Central Europe


This is the earliest to emerge, sometimes as early as February. The first eggs and larvae are ready in March.  Clusters of bright yellow eggs are laid on bare Birch twigs.  Just go out and cut some twigs and arrange them in the cage. The eggs gradually change to a deep purple colour which matches the colour of the twigs. In captivity, the eggs can hatch before the Birch buds are open, so keep some twigs warm inside, standing in water, to get them to sprout. If you can sleeve the larvae on a growing plant, potted or in the ground, rearing is very easy. The larvae, black at first,  cluster on the twigs. Later they are green and spread out a little, clinging on to the twigs, they look just like Birch catkins. Absolute masters of camouflage. In May the larvae pupate in soil and settle down until the new season starts again in February. This is a very easy species: just make sure you have enough growing Birch (it can be in pots). The male and female moths share the same patterning, but the female is much larger and the male has particularly rich chestnut markings. Pairing is easy. Just leave the moths together and Nature takes care of things.

 

Note Kentish Glory larvae can also be fed on Hazel, Alder, Hornbeam, and Lime. It is probable that other alternative tree species may be used as foodplant.