SPRING and SUMMER EGGS and LARVAE Order now for supply in season

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Boisduval's Silkmoth Caligula boisduvali 15 eggs
Availability: NOW


Boisduval's Silkmoth Caligula boisduvali Far Eastern Russia 15 eggs

Keep eggs refrigerated until late March, or when the first buds open.

The last time this species was offered by WWB was over 40 years ago!  The young larvae are most decorative. Recorded foodplants include Ornamental Crab Apple Malus, Hawthorn, Sallow, Osier, Sometimes Privet and undoubtedly a number of other trees and shrubs.

Final instar larvae are covered in short bristles and the caterpillar is lime green all over.

The moths emerge in autumn. Their eggs hatch in the following spring. 

£13.95 £12.95
Cherry Moth promethea 15 eggs
Availability: Summer 2019


Cherry Moth Callosamia promethea North America 

The male and female moths are so different that they might be taken for two different species. The male is mainly black, with very shapely wings. The ground colour of the female is wine red. 

Promethea flies and breeds by day: the males like sunshine but must not be left out to bake. Pairing is often easy, and sometimes difficult! 

The larvae are gregarious until quite large, when they take on a very unusual appearance, being white, with knobbles like sealing wax in bright reds, yellows and oranges.

Foodplants include Lilac and Cherry, Privet, Ash, Apple, Pear, Oak, Rhododendron, Willow, Lime, Tulip Tree Liriodendron, Peach,  possibly Maple, Poplar and even Pine will also be taken.

 

£12.95
Madagascan Emperor Antherina suraka 15 eggs
Availability: Summer 2019


Madagascan Emperor Antherina suraka 

Not only is the moth highly colourful and attractive, but the larvae are also fascinating, with more different forms of colour and pattern than we have seen in any other species! 

The black stage, marked with orange tubercles, changes to green with a variety of other colours and patterns. They are easy to keep and will take a variety of foodplants. Those reported include Oleander, Privet, Willows, Beech, Liquidambar, Hawthorn, Grapevine, Lilac, Cherry, Laurel, Forcythia, Rhus, Pistachia, Apple, Pear, Plum, Peach and Cabbage. In winter Privet is the ideal foodplant.

Keep the larvae and cocoons warm and moths will emerge from cocoons without a dormant period. The moths are the easiest of all species to breed.

We highly recommend this species.

£12.95
Dictyoploca simla 15 ova
Availability: NOW


Dictyoploca simla Asia

Store the eggs in a fridge until the buds open in spring. Extremely fluffy larvae, with long sweeping hairs and prominent spiracles.  They feed well on Hawthorn, Hazel, Plum, Blackthorn, Sweet Chestnut and probably other trees. The cocoon has an interesting open net appearance, through which the pupa is clearly visible.  Not commonly obtained and much recommended.  The moths emerge in autumn and lay eggs which are dormant until spring.

£14.95