SPRING and SUMMER EGGS and LARVAE Order now for supply in season

Display: List / Grid
Show:
Sort By:
Lime Hawk tiliae 15 eggs or 10 larvae according to availability
Availability: NOW


Lime Hawkmoth Mimas tiliae 

Extremely easy to rear on Lime or Elm. Other reported foodplants include Cherry, Alder, Birch, Oak, Hazel, Acer including Sycamore, Sorbus, Apple, Pear and Ash! In autumn the larvae will grow faster if kept warm.

The larvae do particularly well sleeved on growing foodplant but can be kept in plastic boxes or cages. Beautiful streamlined larvae. Larger larvae are often heavily marked with flame and scarlet spots and blotches. Very variable. They pupate underground. In captivity they will pupate amongst folds of cloth or absorbent tissue. Store pupae refrigerated for the winter. The moths normally emerge in May/June.


 

£12.50 +vat
Eyed Hawk ocellata eggs
Availability: NOW


Eyed Hawk Smerinthus ocellata  

Fascinatingly camouflaged larvae which exactly match their leafy background. Easy to breed.

The larvae feed on Apple, Willows, Poplars. Other reported foodplants are Lime, Privet, Alder, Birch, Plum, Blackthorn, some Viburnums, Various Prunus, Laurel.

At pupation time, provide a container of compost to a depth of about 10cm, with a lid. The larvae burrow to pupate.  The moths, with vivid eye-spots, emerge the following spring.

 

 

Privet Hawk Sphinx ligustri 15 eggs
Availability: Jun/Jul 2024


Privet Hawkmoth Sphinx ligustri 

One of the largest Hawkmoths. The caterpillar becomes enormous and is characteristic of the name Sphinx moths, by its sphinx-like resting position. Adults emerge in June and July.  They need nectar from the flowers of Privet, Valerian, Buddleia.  

Larval foodplants: Privet, Lilac, Ash, also reportedly Spiraea, Viburnum opulus, and other Viburnums,  Holly, Dogwood, Snowberry, Apple, Pear, Oleander, Leycesteria, Currant.

One generation in the year. Privet Hawks breed readily in a large cage with nectar and foodplant. 

The large pupae are formed underground. Store the pupae for emergence next summer. 

£12.95 +vat
Pine Hawk Pinastri 15 eggs
Availability: Summer 2025


Pine Hawk Hyloicus pinastri 

These are the last eggs for this season. 

Extremely easy to rear on Pine. The larvae change colour and pattern as they shed their skins and grow, each new attire demonstrating remarkable camouflage. They do best sleeved on growing pine but can also be reared on cut food as long as well cared for and hygienic conditions maintained. The larvae pupate in the soil.  Store pupae refrigerated until next summer.

£13.95 +vat
Elephant Hawk elpenor 15 eggs or 10 larvae, according to availability.
Availability: Summer 2024


Elephant Hawk Dielephila elpenor  

A most attractive and easy species to rear. The larvae feed on Willowherbs, Fuschia, Virginia Creeper, Vine and Bedstraw. Fast-growing, the larvae have two colour forms, starting green they change to black, or a lovely green form, the green being the rarest.

The larvae pupate amongst leaf litter on the ground, and emerge next spring as one of the most beautiful of all hawkmoths.

£14.95 +vat
Small Elephant Hawk porcellus 15 eggs
Availability: June 2024


Small Elephant Hawk Dielephila porcellus 

Very seldom can we offer eggs and larvae of this brilliantly coloured and delicate little Hawkmoth. The larvae are miniatures of the Elephant Hawk.

The best foodplant is Bedstraw Gallium, any species, also Willowherb, Purple Loosestrife, Impatiens (Balsam and perhaps Busy Lizzie), Vine and Parthenocissus. Don’t miss this opportunity of rearing the Small Elephant Hawk this year.

 

 

 

£15.95 +vat
Oleander Hawk nerii 15 eggs or 10 larvae, according to availability
Availability: Summer 2024


Oleander Hawk Daphnis nerii 

Because the egg stage is only a few days, they cannot be supplied outside Britain.

One of the finest of all Hawkmoths. The larvae are very fast growing indeed and they consume a lot of food. It is often possible to have the larvae from hatching to pupation in little more than a month.

Larvae thrive on Privet and can be reared on Periwinkle Vinca, or Honeysuckle Lonicera. Suitable for winter or summer rearing. Oleander Nerium is a natural foodplant but it is often tough and leathery, so the alternives are usually better than Oleander.

 

£17.95 +vat
Convolvulous Hawk convolvuli 10 larvae
Availability: Autumn


Convolvulous Hawkmoth Herse convolvuli 

The moths have started breeding. Larvae will follow next month.  Not available every year: these are very special! 

Huge caterpillars: fascinating to rear.  The pupa has a curious proboscis, like a jug handle. Feeds at dusk, Tobacco plants, Petunia, Lillies and Phlox.

Larval Foodplants: Convolvulus, Field Bindweed, Hedge Bindweed, some Morning Glories.

Best reared in Plastic Rearing Containers: see the advice at the heading of that section of the WWB website. Keep at about 25 degrees C. The paper lining and food must be changed EVERY day. Food needs to be very fresh at all times. When larger the larvae may need this change twice a day, due to their productivity!

Larvae pupate in deep compost. Amazing pupae with jug-handle exterior proboscis case!. The pupae may be held cool until next season or incubated to produce moths in a month or two.

£17.95 £14.95 +vat
Clifden Nonpareil Catocala fraxini FIVE pupae for breeding.
Availability: July


Clifden Nonpareil or Blue Underwing Catocala fraxini pupae

This is probably only the second time we have been able to offer pupae of this magnificent and very large European Noctuid. Allow the moths some space for nuptual flight. Cover a laying box, or round tub,  with two layers of netting. The females lay eggs on the netting. Store the eggs away from pests in a cool place or fridge for the winter.

This species is now almost extinct in Britain. We are offering European stock of this fine moth, the largest of all Underwings and remarkable for its BLUE hindwings. Store the eggs refrigerated until May. The young larvae are immensely active and care must be taken when transferring them to fooplant on hatching, because they can tangle themselves up if you try to move more than one at a time! Feed on Aspen and other Poplars. The larvae are the larges of this genus and very satisfying to rear. Moths emerge in late summer, laying eggs that overwinter.

£24.95 +vat
Clifden Nonpareil (Blue Underwing) Catocala fraxini 15 Eggs
Availability: Autumn


Clifden Nonpareil (Blue Underwing) Catocala fraxini

The largest underwing, spectacular blue. Store eggs refrigerated until May.

This species is now almost extinct in Britain. We are offering European stock of this fine moth, the largest of all Underwings and remarkable for its BLUE hindwings. The young larvae are immensely active and care must be taken when transferring them to fooplant on hatching, because they can tangle themselves up if you try to move more than one at a time! Feed on Aspen and other Poplars. The larvae are the largest of this genus and very satisfying to rear. Moths emerge in late summer, laying eggs that overwinter.

£14.95 +vat
Jersey Tiger quadripunctaria 10 larvae
Availability: Summer


Jersey Tiger Moth Euplagia quadripunctaria

 A very active and exotic European tiger moth, which occurs in a very small area of the  south-west of Britain, the Torbay area, as well as in Europe. 

The larvae feed on Hemp Agrimony, Dandelion, Forgetmenot, Dock, Nettle, Dead Nettle, Plantain, Bramble and other low-growing plants. The larvae, as with other Tigers, have prominent tufts of hair, and colourful markings. The hairs may give a rash on handling, but seldom do. Pupae are formed in leaf litter. 


Hibernating is achieved well on potted foodplant protected from predators by a fine net enclosing pot and plant. In spring the larvae begin to feed again and produce moths in summer.

£16.95 +vat
Cinnabar Moth Hipocrita jacobaeae 15 larvae
Availability: July 2024


Cinnabar Moth Hipocrita jacobaeae

Once an extremely common British Moth, less common over most of Europe, but over the last 10 years there has been a marked decline in numbers. The summer of 2016 brought a reversal of this decline and we can help this species back from danger of disappearing.

The larvae feed on Groundsel and Ragwort Senecio. The larvae are ringed in bright orange and black, nature's warning colours, and they absorb chemicals from the foodplant that adversely affect predators who ignore the warning. Ragwort is a mis-understood plant that provides an abundance of nectar to bees, butterflies and other insects. There is evidence that Ragwort plants that are pulled up and left to dry, can be detrimental to cattle and horses if they eat the dried plants. Animals can be seen grazing safely in fields containing growing green plants. There is nothing to be gained from pulling up Ragwort plants, because they are biennials that flower and die in the same year. So a patch of Ragwort can provide valuable nectar to thousands of wild insects, and be host to Cinnabar larvae and, job completed, it dies at the end of summer. 

The Cinnabar moth flies by day, more than by night, and is protected from predators, by the very striking colours of charcoal and scarlet, and bitter-tasting chemicals derived from the larval foodplant, enabling the moth to display its bright colours, yet not be attacked by predators. 

Cinnabar larvae can be raised in sleeves on growing Ragwort. We find the sleeves fitted with a zip are particularly successful. When the larvae are large, if you put in the sleeve several handfuls of springy wood shavings or dried leaf litter, they will form thin silken cocoons in which to pupate.

Could you help to spread this colourful day-flying moth again in your area?

Store pupae cool for the winter, even in a fridge, loose in a plastic box, without any padding.  In May lay them out in an emerging cage and wait for the moths to emerge.

 

£12.95 +vat