SPRING and SUMMER EGGS and LARVAE Order now for supply in season

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Brown Hairstreak T. betulae 20 eggs
Availability: NOW


Brown Hairstreak Thecla betulae

 Eggs of the Brown Hairstreak are available through autumn and winter. They are laid on Blackthorn twigs. Keep the eggs in a very cool place until the Blackthorn buds open in spring.The larvae hatch and quickly burrow into the opening buds to feed until they are much larger. It is best to keep them on growing foodplant.

£12.95
Common Blue icarus 10 larvae
Availability: September


The Common Blue Polyommatus icarus

 This Blue is probably the most wide-spread of all the Blues.  The bright sky-blue of the male is familiar to most people. The larvae feed on Birdsfoot Trefoil, Medick, Rest Harrow and other Leguminosae.

The larvae are very small. If you are not an experienced breeder it would be better to choose one of the easier species to rear.

 

£12.50
White-letter Hairstreak Strymonidia w-album 10 eggs
Availability: September


White-letter Hairstreak Strymonidia w-album

 

Some eggs available immediately, for a short period. Very difficult to obtain.

Very seldom available. Winter is passed in the eggs stage.  Feed spring larvae on Elm and Wych Elm. Ideally sleeve outside, or pot foodplant to feed sleeved larvae indoors or outside. 

Wych Elm flower buds are breaking in early February, even in the north. These are sometimes on branches higher off the ground. Some even start as early as November in milder winters. Flowering trees need very little patience to search out.  

The larvae only require the buds to be “cracking open” for them to find a crevice to sit in and start burrowing further into the bud.


 

 

 

£29.95
Deathshead Hawk Atropos 15 Eggs,
Availability: NOW


Deathshead Hawkmoth Acheronia atropos  

Everyone’s favourite. An extreme rarity, migrating to Britain from Africa. Occasionally the larvae are found in potato fields but that’s if you are lucky and these days with modern machinery the chances of larvae being found are even more remote.

The larvae feed on many plants in the potato family, Solanaceae, but you don’t have to have these to keep the larvae: they do well on Privet. They have also been found feeding on Buddleia, resulting in a pale coloured larva that matches the leaves, but this is not a recommended foodplant.

The duration of the egg stage is just a few days, and the larvae grow probably twice as fast as our native hawkmoth larvae, completing their life cycle in as little as 4-6 weeks in summer temperatures. These larvae will produce another generation of moths within weeks of pupation, but you can keep them cool in the winter months, and have them emerge in spring. 

The moth is just amazing to have alive on your hand! It is furry, and squeaks – almost like handling a little mammal. It also humps its back and displays the blue markings on the body, as well as the famous skull and crossbones on the thorax. The moth needs to feed, not from flowers but from a pad soaked in weak honey or sugar solution. Moths have been found inside beehives, attracted by the sweet smell of honey. 

In summer, the pupae will emerge within about 4 weeks.  In autumn, to overwinter, bury the pupae in light compost that is not too damp but not allowed to dry out. The top of each pupa should be just showing. Store in a cool place (10-15 degrees C) away from predadors. Bring into the warm in April ready for May emergence. 
 

£13.95
Small Eyed Sphinx Paonias myops North America 15 eggs
Availability: July/August


Small Eyed Sphinx Paonias myops North America

The first time offered on the WWB website. Something quite different and highly recommended. 

The Small Eyed Sphinx is not a Smerinthus and the larvae are more found on Prunus trees than on Salix. These are some of the recorded foodplants: Most Prunus, including Cherry, Plum, Laurel, Lilac, Privet, Lime, Willows and Sallows and even Grapevine.

The larva has characteristics of our Poplar and Eyed Hawks. The moth is much smaller than other Eyed Hawks, and has wonderfully camouflaged forewings. This 

£13.95
Sphinx jamaicensis 15 eggs or 10 larvae according to availability
Availability: July/August


Sphinx jamaicensis North America

A boldly marked and colourful American Eyed Hawk.  Easily bred on Willows, Poplars, Sallows and Apple. They are said also to feed on Birch, Elm, Ash and Plum. No doubt other foodplants can be discovered!

 
 


 

£12.95
Poplar Hawk Laothoe populi 15 eggs or 10 larvae according to availability.
Availability: July


Poplar Hawkmoth Laothoe populi 

Fast growing, the larvae feed on most Willows and Poplars. They do well in sleeves or caged.

This is one of the few hawkmoths that produce two broods of moths in the year.

The larvae become very fat and vary in both the ground colour, in shades of green or blue/green, and in their markings which often include red spots as well as the oblique stripes down the sides.

The larvae need to burrow into compost for pupation.

 

£12.50
Lime Hawk tiliae 15 eggs
Availability: September


Lime Hawkmoth Mimas tiliae 

Extremely easy to rear on Lime or Elm. Other reported foodplants include Cherry, Alder, Birch, Oak, Hazel, Acer including Sycamore, Sorbus, Apple, Pear and Ash! In autumn the larvae will grow faster if kept warm.

The larvae do particularly well sleeved on growing foodplant but can be kept in plastic boxes or cages. Beautiful streamlined larvae. Larger larvae are often heavily marked with flame and scarlet spots and blotches. Very variable. They pupate underground. In captivity they will pupate amongst folds of cloth or absorbent tissue. Store pupae refrigerated for the winter. The moths normally emerge in May/June.


 

£11.50
Eyed Hawk ocellata eggs SPECIAL PRICES
Availability: NOW


Eyed Hawk Smerinthus ocellata  

Fascinatingly camouflaged larvae which exactly match their leafy background. Easy to breed.

The larvae feed on Apple, Willows, Poplars. Other reported foodplants are Lime, Privet, Alder, Birch, Plum, Blackthorn, some Viburnums, Various Prunus, Laurel.

At pupation time, provide a container of compost to a depth of about 10cm, with a lid. The larvae burrow to pupate.  The moths, with vivid eye-spots, emerge the following spring.

 

 

Eyed Hawk ocellata FIFTY eggs LOWEST PRICE EVER!
Availability: NOW


Eyed Hawk Smerinthus ocellata  

Fascinatingly camouflaged larvae which exactly match their leafy background. Easy to breed.

The larvae feed on Apple, Willows, Poplars. Other reported foodplants are Lime, Privet, Alder, Birch, Plum, Blackthorn, some Viburnums, Various Prunus, Laurel.

At pupation time, provide a container of compost to a depth of about 10cm, with a lid. The larvae burrow to pupate.  The moths, with vivid eye-spots, emerge the following spring.

 

 

£20.00
Smerinthus caecus, RUSSIA A Breeding Stock of 5 pupae
Availability: NOW


Smerinthus caecus, RUSSIA 

Never before offered by WWB. This Eyed Hawk lives principally in Russia where it has been recorded right across this huge expanse, into the Far Eastern region. It has also been recorded in Korea, parts of China, and in Japan.

The larvae feed on Poplars and Willows. Maybe worth trying to discover additonal foodplants. A number of different colour forms of larvae have been photographed, and these may even be related to the lighting conditions in which they live, and on the foodplants. 

This is an opportunity to learn more about this species. 

£14.95
Heliconius species 15 eggs or 10 larvae according to availability.
Availability: Summer 2020


Heliconius species Central and South America

Larvae feed on Passion Plant Passifolora caerulea. Often in clusters when young, the larvae grow fast in warm conditions. Ideally on growing foodplant.

Larvae may be of more than one species. Melpomone and erato , probably could include some cydno and hecale. 

The Heliconius butterflies are mimetic, not only of each other, but they also imitate other species that are distastful to predators. So don't be surprised if your butterflies don't have the same pattern and marking as the illustration, but they do have the same narrow wing shape in common, and their habits are wonderful to observe. Some are capapble of hovering and even flying backwards. The butterflies are able to gather not only nectar through the proboscis, but also pollen which they store in the coils of the proboscis.

Some individuals have been known to survive for months, even in captive conditions.

Eggs are laid on the growing shoots and tendrils of Passiflora, on which the larvae feed. Most lay eggs individually though some lay in groups. The butterflies are continuously brooded and can become a magnificent feature of a greenhouse or conservatory.

 

£12.95