SPRING and SUMMER EGGS and LARVAE Order now for supply in season

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White-letter Hairstreak Strymonidia w-album 15 eggs
Availability: Late summer


White-letter Hairstreak Strymonidia w-album

Very seldom available. Winter is passed in the eggs stage.  Feed spring larvae on Elm and Wych Elm. Ideally sleeve outside, or pot foodplant to feed sleeved larvae indoors or outside. 

Wych Elm flower buds are breaking in early February, even in the north. These are sometimes on branches higher off the ground. Some even start as early as November in milder winters. Flowering trees need very little patience to search out.  

The larvae only require the buds to be “cracking open” for them to find a crevice to sit in and start burrowing further into the bud.

£29.00
Silver-spotted Skipper Hesperia comma 15 eggs
Availability: New orders: winter 2021


Silver-spotted Skipper Hesperia comma

Fifteen eggs of this scarce Skipper butterfly. Store the eggs cold until February. Then transfer to a pot of coarse grass. Pot and plant totally enclosed in a sleeve.

Keep the larvae on potted coarse grasses, covered with the sleeve to prevent straying and predation. Sheep's Fescue grass is particularly good. The larva uses silk to construct a shelter, by sewing together the edges of a grass blade, The larvae hibernate on the potted food, which is best kept outside. In spring the larvae resume feeding, pupate and produce adults in early summer.

£20.00
Deathshead Hawk Atropos 15 Eggs or 10 larvae according to availability
Availability: July/August


Deathshead Hawkmoth Acheronia atropos  

Everyone’s favourite. There are many orders but we can book more for supply once these have been supplied. An extreme rarity, migrating to Britain from Africa. Occasionally the larvae are found in potato fields but that’s if you are lucky and these days with modern machinery the chances of larvae being found are even more remote. 

The larvae feed on many plants in the potato family, Solanaceae, but you don’t have to have these to keep the larvae: they do well on Privet. They have also been found feeding on Buddleia, resulting in a pale coloured larva that matches the leaves, but this is not a recommended foodplant.

The duration of the egg stage is just a few days, and the larvae grow probably twice as fast as our native hawkmoth larvae, completing their life cycle in as little as 4-6 weeks in summer temperatures. These larvae will produce another generation of moths within weeks of pupation, but you can keep them cool in the winter months, and have them emerge in spring. 

The moth is just amazing to have alive on your hand! It is furry, and squeaks – almost like handling a little mammal. It also humps its back and displays the blue markings on the body, as well as the famous skull and crossbones on the thorax. The moth needs to feed, not from flowers but from a pad soaked in weak honey or sugar solution. Moths have been found inside beehives, attracted by the sweet smell of honey. 

In summer, the pupae will emerge within about 4 weeks.  In autumn, to overwinter, bury the pupae in light compost that is not too damp but not allowed to dry out. The top of each pupa should be just showing. Store in a cool place (10-15 degrees C) away from predadors. Bring into the warm in April ready for May emergence. 
 

£13.95
Small Eyed Sphinx Paonias myops North America 15 eggs
Availability: NOW


Small Eyed Sphinx Paonias myops North America

The first time offered on the WWB website. Something quite different and highly recommended. 

The Small Eyed Sphinx is not a Smerinthus and the larvae are more found on Prunus trees than on Salix. These are some of the recorded foodplants: Most Prunus, including Cherry, Plum, Laurel, Lilac, Privet, Lime, Willows and Sallows and even Grapevine.

The larva has characteristics of our Poplar and Eyed Hawks. The moth is much smaller than other Eyed Hawks, and has wonderfully camouflaged forewings. This 

£13.95
Canadian Eyed Hawk Smerinthus cerisyi 15 eggs or 10 larvae according to availability
Availability: Spring


Canadian Eyed Hawk Smerinthus cerisyi

A species from the New World with interesting differences from our own Eyed Hawk. The larvae feed on Willows, Sallows and Apple. Fast growing.  For something different give these a try. This species breeds easily and is a joy to rear. Larvae do well sleeved.

£12.95
Sphinx jamaicensis 15 eggs or 10 larvae according to availability
Availability: July/August


Sphinx jamaicensis North America

A boldly marked and colourful American Eyed Hawk.  Easily bred on Willows, Poplars, Sallows and Apple. They are said also to feed on Birch, Elm, Ash and Plum. No doubt other foodplants can be discovered!

 
 


 

£12.95
Poplar Hawk Laothoe populi 15 eggs
Availability: NOW


Poplar Hawkmoth Laothoe populi 

Fast growing, the larvae feed on most Willows and Poplars. They do well in sleeves or caged.

This is one of the few hawkmoths that produce two broods of moths in the year.

The larvae become very fat and vary in both the ground colour, in shades of green or blue/green, and in their markings which often include red spots as well as the oblique stripes down the sides.

The larvae need to burrow into compost for pupation.

 

£12.95
Lime Hawk tiliae 15 eggs
Availability: NOW


Lime Hawkmoth Mimas tiliae 

Extremely easy to rear on Lime or Elm. Other reported foodplants include Cherry, Alder, Birch, Oak, Hazel, Acer including Sycamore, Sorbus, Apple, Pear and Ash! In autumn the larvae will grow faster if kept warm.

The larvae do particularly well sleeved on growing foodplant but can be kept in plastic boxes or cages. Beautiful streamlined larvae. Larger larvae are often heavily marked with flame and scarlet spots and blotches. Very variable. They pupate underground. In captivity they will pupate amongst folds of cloth or absorbent tissue. Store pupae refrigerated for the winter. The moths normally emerge in May/June.


 

£12.50
Great American Poplar Hawk modesta 15 eggs or 10 larvae according to availability.
Availability: Spring


American Great Poplar Hawk Pachysphinx modesta 

This Hawkmoth is like a very large and stocky Poplar Hawk, with very bold pattern and colouring. The larva is very large and has some interesting differences, and feeds on Poplars, probably Willows also. Try this fascinating and very large relative of our Poplar Hawk.



 

£12.95
Eyed Hawk ocellata eggs
Availability: NOW


Eyed Hawk Smerinthus ocellata  

Fascinatingly camouflaged larvae which exactly match their leafy background. Easy to breed.

The larvae feed on Apple, Willows, Poplars. Other reported foodplants are Lime, Privet, Alder, Birch, Plum, Blackthorn, some Viburnums, Various Prunus, Laurel.

At pupation time, provide a container of compost to a depth of about 10cm, with a lid. The larvae burrow to pupate.  The moths, with vivid eye-spots, emerge the following spring.

 

 

Eyed Hawk ocellata FIFTY eggs LOWEST PRICE EVER!
Availability: NOW


Eyed Hawk Smerinthus ocellata  

Fascinatingly camouflaged larvae which exactly match their leafy background. Easy to breed.

The larvae feed on Apple, Willows, Poplars. Other reported foodplants are Lime, Privet, Alder, Birch, Plum, Blackthorn, some Viburnums, Various Prunus, Laurel.

At pupation time, provide a container of compost to a depth of about 10cm, with a lid. The larvae burrow to pupate.  The moths, with vivid eye-spots, emerge the following spring.

 

 

£20.00
Privet Hawk Sphinx ligustri 15 eggs
Availability: July/August


Privet Hawkmoth Sphinx ligustri 

One of the largest Hawkmoths. The caterpillar becomes enormous and is characteristic of the name Sphinx moths, by its sphinx-like resting position. Adults emerge in June and July.  They need nectar from the flowers of Privet, Valerian, Buddleia.  

Larval foodplants: Privet, Lilac, Ash, also reportedly Spiraea, Viburnum opulus, and other Viburnums,  Holly, Dogwood, Snowberry, Apple, Pear, Oleander, Leycesteria, Currant.

One generation in the year. Privet Hawks breed readily in a large cage with nectar and foodplant. 

The large pupae are formed underground. Store the pupae for emergence next summer. 

£12.95