WINTER PUPAE for breeding in the following season

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Giant Peacock Moth pyri Cocoons
Availability: Autumn


Giant Peacock Moth Saturnia pyri

Magnificent - Europe’s largest moth. Flies in May, pairs easily and lays prodigiously. Exotic looking larvae.
Rear the larvae in warm, dry conditions. They are very easy to rear in the first instars and extra care is needed to bring them through the final instars. They repay proper care, growing fast and changing colour.

The large larva is as handsome as the tropical Saturniidae and has much in common with Moon Moth larvae, but with sapphire blue tubercles. They do well on Blackthorn and Plum and will often feed on other fruit trees and HawthornWillows, Alder and Birch.

Chinese Oak Silkmoth Antheraea pernyi Large cocoons fresh from CHINA
Availability: NOW


Chinese Oak Silkmoth Antheraea pernyi Large cocoons fresh from CHINA

Highly recommended for those who are looking for a spectacular moth, with LARGE exotic larvae: easily reared.  

 

 

 

 

This species used to be universally available. Over the years captive bred stocks have disappointingly become in-bred. We now have strong wild Chinese stock, and orders can be taken now for eggs and larvae available from May.

A large species, and probably the best for beginners. Moths emerge in the spring. They pair very easily.

Eggs are laid on the sides of the cage. The larvae feed on Oak, Apple, Hawthorn, Beech, Willow and undoubtedly other trees and shrubs. Black at first, the larvae become green, with decorations of orange. The larvae become very large and eat a great deal of food. Although an oriental species, pernyi  has now become established in Europe.

There are two generations of moths each summer.

Bullseye Moth Automeris io  cocoons
Availability: Autumn 2024


Bullseye Moth Automeris io North America 

This small silkmoth has a number of interesting characteristics. The male and female are distinctly different colours – both have the enormous eye markings on the hindwings which are exposed when the moth is disturbed. The larvae are covered by branched spines – don’t touch them – they sting like a nettle. They are gregarious until the larvae are quite large, changing colour at each skin change. Very interesting and easy to rear.

For pairing, keep the moths in a cage the size of the Pyjama Mini Cage. Fertile eggs develop a black dot which is the micropyle, through which the embryo breathes. A useful indicator of fertility, not present in most other species.

The larvae are polyphagous, ie they will accept a wide variety of foodplants, which include such trees as Oak, Lime, Willow, Hazel, Bramble, Apple, Hawthorn and more.

Oak Silkmoth polyphemus  cocoons
Availability: Autumn


American Oak Silkmoth Antheraea polyphemus

The hindwings of both sexes have huge target eyespots. Pairing sometimes easy, other times changes of setup are needed.  The female lays a large number of eggs.

The larvae are easy to rear on Oak or Osier Willow. Along the sides of larger larvae there are silver spangles, like drops of mercury. Lovely larvae to rear.

They are also reported to feed on Hawthorn,Oak, Birch, Willow, Sallow, Maple, Apple, Cherry, Alder, Elm. Also try Walnut, Pseudacacia, Sumac Rhus typhina.

American Moon Moth Actias luna Cocoons
Availability: Autumn


American Moon Moth Actias luna North America

A very attractive Moon Moth that emerges from May and breeds exceptionally easily.  The larvae feed well on Walnut, Birch, Osier Willow, Liquidambar, Plane, Maples, Aspen, Plum, Sallow,  Several kinds of Oak and maybe other foodplants.

A second brood is produced in late summer. Winter is passed in the cocoon stage. Store them cold from November until April. May is the normal emergence time for the first brood.