SPRING and SUMMER PUPAE You can order these NOW in advance

Display: List / Grid
Show:
Sort By:
Adonis Blue bellargus 5 pupae
Availability: Summer 2018


The Adonis Blue Lysandra bellargus

 

The intense blue iridescence of the male is unmatched in Europe. The female has a rich burnt umber colouring.  To raise the larvae you need Horseshoe vetch Hippocrepis comosa, a low-growing plant, covered with yellow flowers in May, requiring calcareous soil.  The larvae, which will also feed on Coronilla, feed rapidly and pupate among the base of the foodplant.  In Britain the Adonis is double brooded, the adults flying in June and August.

 

 

 

£15.00
Deathshead Hawk atropos pupae
Availability: Imminent


Deathshead Hawkmoth Acherontia atropos Pupae

 

2017 orders have been supplied. We hope there may be some late autumn pupae. If not, your order will be held for priority display in 2018.

 

These pupae will produce moths this year.

 

In winter moths may be produced before spring if the pupae are kept warm.  To overwinter, bury the pupae in light compost that is not too damp but not allowed to dry out. The top of each pupa should be just showing. Store in a cool place (10-12 degrees C) away from predadors. Bring into the warm in April ready for May emergence. 

 

The larvae feed on many plants in the potato family, Solanaceae, but you don’t have to have these to keep the larvae, they do well on Privet. They have also been found feeding on Buddleia, resulting in a pale coloured larva that matches the leaves. The duration of the egg stage is just a few days, and the larvae grow probably twice as fast as our native hawkmoth larvae, completing their life cycle in as little as 4-6 weeks in summer temperatures.

 

The moth is just amazing to have alive on your hand! It is furry, and squeaks – almost like handling a little mammal. It also humps its back and displays the blue markings on the body, as well as the famous skull and crossbones on the thorax. The moth needs to feed, not from flowers but from a pad soaked in weak honey or sugar solution. Moths have been found inside beehives, attracted by the sweet smell of honey. 

 

 


 
 

Oleander Hawk nerii 2 pupae
Availability: NOW


Oleander Hawkmoth Daphnis nerii  

 

2017 orders have been supplied. We hope there may be some late autumn pupae. If not, your order will be held for priority display in 2018.

 

One of the finest of all Hawkmoths. The larvae are very fast growing indeed and they consume a lot of food. Apart from Oleander Nerium, the larvae thrive on Periwinkle Vinca, and can be reared on Privet Ligustrum. Pupae will produce adults this spring.

 

To overwinter autumn pupae, bury the pupae in light compost that is not too damp but not allowed to dry out. The top of each pupa should be just showing. Store in a cool place (10-15 degrees C) away from predadors. Bring into the warm in April ready for May emergence.

 

£18.50 £15.95
Giant Atlas Moth Attacus atlas cocoons SPECIAL PRICES!
Availability:   


Giant Atlas Moth Attacus atlas

 

SPECIAL PRICES 5 for £29.95 NOW £24.95. 10 for £59.90 NOW £45.95

The largest moth in the world.  Winter cocoons are dormant. You can choose whether to incubate them or keep them cold until the spring. To get them to emerge, raise the temperature to 15 degrees C, and gradually up to 30 degrees C or more, and very humid. They need very warm and humid tropical conditions. When hot soak the cocoons at least once or twice daily. 

It is probably better to keep them cool (8 -12 degrees C) and dormant until mid-April, or even May, then raise the temperature and humidity as described above.  They will respond better to summer conditions.

Pairing is achieved in a cage that is ample for the size of the moths but not so large that they can become too separated.

 

Larvae feed on Privet and are easily reared in conditions that are warm and moist.  Atlas larvae will also feed on Tree of Heaven Ailanthus, Osier Willow Salix viminalis, Citrus and undoubtedly a number of other substitute plants outside their normal habitat.

 

 

 

 

 

 




 

 

African Moon Moth Argema mimosae Cocoons
Availability:   


African Moon Moth Argema mimosae 

 

 

The moth is a miniature of the Giant Madagascan Moon Moth as a whole lot easier to breed!  Spray the cocoons daily, keep at about 25 degrees C, or a little more, and they start to emerge as they do in the rainy season.

 

Pairings are not automatic but not difficult. The larvae are most spectacular and they thrive on Eucalyptus, which is evergreen and therefore suitable for rearing in summer or winter. Other foodplants recorded: Liquidambar, Walnut, Sumac Rhus sp.

 

(No Promotion price stocks left)

 

 





  
 

 

Chestnut Emperor menippe A breeding stock of 5 pupae
Availability:   


Chestnut Emperor Melanocera menippe
 

This is an unusual coastal species of Giant Silkmoth from Kenya. The pupa is formed underground.

The caterpillar is unusually coloured black, covered with fleshy tubercles and markings in scarlet.

The local foodplants are Ochna atropurpurea and Ficus chordata. We have no record of any alternative foodplants, if anyone knows of one please let us know and we will post it on the website. Many African species take to alternatives such as Hawthorn or Oak, and it is well worth trying a mixture if you get a pairing resulting in larvae. It is also worth trying Fig and Evergreen Oak (tender leaves if available).

£15.95
Gonimbrasia zambezina  Two pupae
Availability:   


Gonimbrasia zambezina Africa

 

 

Subterranean pupa. Stock fresh in from Africa. The moth is large and beautifully marked in shades of grey, red and yellow, with prominent eye-spots.

 

Foodplants need confirming but larvae may take to several different trees. These have been reported: Oak, Oleander, Persimmon, Sumac & Brazilian Pepper.

 

Supplies of pupae are limited.

 

 

 


 

£8.50