Kentish Glory, Versicolora 10 larvae

Kentish Glory, Versicolora 10 larvae
Kentish Glory, Versicolora 10 larvae Kentish Glory, Versicolora 10 larvae Kentish Glory, Versicolora 10 larvae Kentish Glory, Versicolora 10 larvae Kentish Glory, Versicolora 10 larvae Kentish Glory, Versicolora 10 larvae Kentish Glory, Versicolora 10 larvae Kentish Glory, Versicolora 10 larvae Kentish Glory, Versicolora 10 larvae Kentish Glory, Versicolora 10 larvae Kentish Glory, Versicolora 10 larvae Kentish Glory, Versicolora 10 larvae Kentish Glory, Versicolora 10 larvae Kentish Glory, Versicolora 10 larvae Kentish Glory, Versicolora 10 larvae Kentish Glory, Versicolora 10 larvae
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Description

Kentish Glory  Endromis versicolora

 

The Eggs are the first of the season to be laid and are sent from February.  They are yellow when laid, later turning maroon in colour, matching the twigs they are laid on.
 

This species is now found only in Scotland, and parts of Central Europe.  Our stock is European.

 

Keep the eggs cool until you have the first leaves of foodplant. Birch is the normal foodplant, but the larvae can also be reared on Hazel, Alder, Hornbeam, and Lime. Rearing of Kentish Glory larvae is very easy, indoors or outside, and they do particularly well sleeved on their foodplant.

 

The larvae, black at first,  cluster on the twigs. Later they are green and spread out a little, clinging on to the twigs, they look just like Birch catkins. Absolute masters of camouflage.

 

In May the larvae pupate in leaf litter and soil and settle down until the new season starts again in February. This is a very easy species. The male and female moths share the same patterning, but the female is much larger and the male has particularly rich chestnut markings. Pairing is easy. Provide twigs of foodplant, on which to lay. At this time there are no leaves. Just leave the moths together pairing and egg-laying take place naturally.

 

Our thanks to Jens Stolt who has kindly allowed us to use his beautiful illustration of the life history of this rare species.