SPRING and SUMMER EGGS and LARVAE Order now for supply in season

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Camberwell Beauty antiopa 10 larvae
Availability: May/June 2018


Camberwell Beauty (Mourning Cloak) Nymphyalis antiopa 

 

 

This species is most difficult to obtain, and supplies have almost impossible for several seasons. Thanks to a new breeder, last year we supplied a large number of larvae and pupae, and we hope and expect to again this season. PLEASE BOOK EARLY!

 

Early orders for larvae have been supplied. The next larvae are due in July. 

 

Camberwell Beauty larvae feed on Sallow Salix caprea, Willows, Birch and some other trees. The larvae are gregarious nearly until pupation when they are most handsome with long branched spines and wonderful contrasting red  blotches on the black ground colour. When it is possible to sleeve the larvae, we recommend this above keeping on cut food, but in wet summers the larvae easily succumbe to disease. It is a good idea to cover the sleeve with polythene to protect from rain, but don't wrap polythene around the sleeve. The just need a roof or umbrella, with plenty of ventilation all round. 

 

To avoid the possibility of mixing geographical races please don't release these in the wild.

 

Please order immediately: orders will be sent in strict rotation.

 

 

£16.95
Black Hairstreak S. pruni TEN eggs
Availability: NOW


Black Hairstreak Strymonidia pruni

 

The Black Hairstreak is one of Britain’s greatest rarities, occuring in very few localities, but doing well in them. Foodplant Blackthorn. We are pleased to be able to offer this very special species now as eggs which are stored cool until the buds open in spring. 

 

 


 


 

£30.00 £20.00
Black Hairstreak S. pruni 10 larvae
Availability: Spring 2018


Black Hairstreak Strymonidia pruni

 

 

 

The Black Hairstreak is one of Britain’s greatest rarities, occuring in very few localities, but doing well in them. Foodplant Blackthorn. We are pleased to be able to offer this very special species now as spring larvae which are best kept sleeved. 
 
 

 

 

£50.00 £28.00
Marbled White galathea 50 larvae
Availability: NOW


Marbled White Butterfly Melanargia galathea

 

A favourite from the chalk downlands of southern Britain. Pre-hibernation larvae which live on potted coarse grasses and produce butterflies next year. To hibernate these larvae you need potted grass, securely contained in a netting sleeve.  Make sure you evict any spiders or other predatory creatures! Keep the pot outside in natural weather conditions.

In spring the larvae will stray, and again in summer when they are ready to find a secluded place in which to hang and change to pupae, so make sure they are in a secure cage.

 

 

£25.00
Marbled White galathea 10 larvae
Availability: NOW


Marbled White Butterfly Melanargia galathea

 

 

A favourite from the chalk downlands of southern Britain. Pre-hibernation larvae which live on potted coarse grasses and produce butterflies next year. To hibernate these larvae you need potted grass, securely contained in a netting sleeve.  Make sure you evict any spiders or other predatory creatures! Keep the pot outside in natural weather conditions.

In spring the larvae will stray and again in summer when they are ready to find a secluded place in which to hang and change to pupae, so make sure they are in a secure cage.

 

£12.95
Brown Hairstreak T. betulae 50 eggs SALE PRICE
Availability: Winter


Brown Hairstreak Thecla betulae

 

Eggs of the Brown Hairstreak are available immediately. They are laid on Blackthorn twigs. Keep the eggs in a very cool place until the Blackthorn buds open in spring.The larvae hatch and quickly burrow into the opening buds to feed until they are much larger. It is best to keep them on growing foodplant.

£26.00 £21.00
Brown Hairstreak T. betulae 10 larvae
Availability: Spring 2018


Brown Hairstreak Thecla betulae

 

Larvae are best sleeved on Blackthorn. These will pupate and produce butterflies this year. Overwinters in the egg stage.

 

 

£12.95
Brown Hairstreak T. betulae 20 eggs
Availability: NOW


Brown Hairstreak Thecla betulae

 

Eggs of the Brown Hairstreak are available through autumn and winter. They are laid on Blackthorn twigs. Keep the eggs in a very cool place until the Blackthorn buds open in spring.The larvae hatch and quickly burrow into the opening buds to feed until they are much larger. It is best to keep them on growing foodplant.

£12.95
Scarce Copper Lycaena virgaureae 12 eggs
Availability: November


Scarce Copper Lycaena virgaureae

Orders have been supplied. Our breeder hopes to have a few more available in a couple of weeks or so.

Overwintering eggs contain a formed larva inside. Store cold for the winter and let the larvae hatch in spring. Supplies are limited. Eggs of virgaureae have not been offered by WWB before.

The male is brilliant fiery copper all over. Females bear striking patterns in black. Both sexes have a sandy orange underside, with a distinguishing line of white spots. The Scarce Copper is widespread in eastern Europe and much of Scandinavia, but in western Europe it occurs only in small areas. This Copper is single brooded, flying in mid to late summer, The larva feeds on several species of Sorrel. They are likely to accept Dock in captivity.

£12.95
Common Blue icarus 10 Larvae
Availability: Summer


The Common Blue Polyommatus icarus

 

This Blue is probably the most wide-spread of all the Blues.  The bright sky-blue of the male is familiar to most people.  The larvae feed on Birdsfoot Trefoil, Medick, Rest Harrow and other Leguminosae.

 

The larvae are very small. If you are not an experienced breeder it would be better to choose one of the easier species to rear.

£12.50
White-letter Hairstreak Strymonidia w-album 10 eggs
Availability: Autumn


White-letter Hairstreak Strymonidia w-album

 

Small numbers are hoped for this autumn.

Very seldom available. Winter is passed in the eggs stage.  Feed spring larvae on Elm and Wych Elm. Ideally sleeve outside, or pot foodplant to feed sleeved larvae indoors or outside. 

Wych Elm flower buds are breaking in early February, even in the north. These are sometimes on branches higher off the ground. Some even start as early as November in milder winters. Flowering trees need very little patience to search out.  

The larvae only require the buds to be “cracking open” for them to find a crevice to sit in and start burrowing further into the bud.


 

 

 

£30.00
Deathshead Hawk Atropos 15 Eggs,
Availability: May/June 2018


Deathshead Hawkmoth Acheronia atropos  15 eggs

 

Eggs hatch very quickly. Orders for Europe are best sent by courier as they arrive in only 1-2 days. Cannot be sent outside Europe. 

 

Everyone’s favourite. An extreme rarity, migrating to Britain from Africa. Occasionally the larvae are found in potato fields but that’s if you are lucky and these days with modern machinery the chances of larvae being found are even more remote. The larvae feed on many plants in the potato family, Solanaceae, but you don’t have to have these to keep the larvae: they do well on Privet. They have also been found feeding on Buddleia, resulting in a pale coloured larva that matches the leaves. The duration of the egg stage is just a few days, and the larvae grow probably twice as fast as our native hawkmoth larvae, completing their life cycle in as little as 4-6 weeks in summer temperatures. These larvae will produce another generation of moths within weeks of pupation, but you can keep them cool in the winter months, and have them emerge in spring. The moth is just amazing to have alive on your hand! It is furry, and squeaks – almost like handling a little mammal. It also humps its back and displays the blue markings on the body, as well as the famous skull and crossbones on the thorax. The moth needs to feed, not from flowers but from a pad soaked in weak honey or sugar solution. Moths have been found inside beehives, attracted by the sweet smell of honey. 

 

In summer, the pupae will emerge within about 4 weeks.  In autumn, to overwinter, bury the pupae in light compost that is not too damp but not allowed to dry out. The top of each pupa should be just showing. Store in a cool place (10-15 degrees C) away from predadors. Bring into the warm in April ready for May emergence. 
 
 


 

£13.95