Ampelophaga rubiginosa from Far Eastern Russia A breeding stock of 5 pupae

Ampelophaga rubiginosa from Far Eastern Russia A breeding stock of 5 pupae
Ampelophaga rubiginosa from Far Eastern Russia A breeding stock of 5 pupae Ampelophaga rubiginosa from Far Eastern Russia A breeding stock of 5 pupae Ampelophaga rubiginosa from Far Eastern Russia A breeding stock of 5 pupae Ampelophaga rubiginosa from Far Eastern Russia A breeding stock of 5 pupae Ampelophaga rubiginosa from Far Eastern Russia A breeding stock of 5 pupae Ampelophaga rubiginosa from Far Eastern Russia A breeding stock of 5 pupae Ampelophaga rubiginosa from Far Eastern Russia A breeding stock of 5 pupae Ampelophaga rubiginosa from Far Eastern Russia A breeding stock of 5 pupae Ampelophaga rubiginosa from Far Eastern Russia A breeding stock of 5 pupae Ampelophaga rubiginosa from Far Eastern Russia A breeding stock of 5 pupae
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Description

Ampelophaga rubiginosa from Far Eastern Russia

 

Summer pupae may be incubated to produce another generation, or kept cool to breed next season.

 

Never before offered by WWB. This Hawkmoth is seldom available. The moths apparently seldom come to light, nor to flowers. Its range extends from the Himalayas, Far East (Russia, China, Japan), southwards through, Myanmar and Thailand, and Indo China to Malaysia and Sumatra. Markings of the moth and depth of colour are quite variable.

 

The larvae are very attractive, differing with changes of instar; very streamlined and strongly reminiscent of the North American Darapsa myron. In the final instar some larvae have a patterned brown form. They feed on Virginia Creeper and Boston Ivy Parthenocissus and Vine Vitis. There are reports of larvae accepting Hydrangea paniculata, Salix and Malus. It seems that there is a need to confirm these and maybe finding other food plants. Try Osier Salix viminalis, which has been so successful for many species, but have creeper or vine available in case the experimental plants are rejected.

 

The pupae have the curious habit of wriggling violently when sprayed, even appearing to hop around!

 

The number of generations in a year depends on the latitude and climate. In captivity and summer conditions, a second brood is quite probable. 

 

This species is highly recommended for the connoisseur breeder, and a great photographic opportunity.